EThe New Revenue Recognition Standard: FASB ASC 606 – Audit and Accounting Guide Depository and Lending Institutions, 2nd Edition

Appendix E
The New Revenue Recognition Standard: FASB ASC 606

This appendix is nonauthoritative and is included for informational purposes only.

Overview

On May 28, 2014, the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) and FASB issued a joint accounting standard on revenue recognition to address a number of concerns regarding the complexity and lack of consistency surrounding the accounting for revenue transactions. Consistent with each board’s policy, FASB issued Accounting Standards Update (ASU) No. 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606), and the IASB issued International Financial Reporting Standard (IFRS) 15, Revenue from Contracts with Customers. FASB ASU No. 2014-09 will amend the FASB Accounting Standards Codification® (ASC) by creating a new Topic 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers, and a new Subtopic 340-40, Other Assets and Deferred Costs—Contracts with Customers. The guidance in ASU No. 2014-09 provides what FASB describes as a framework for revenue recognition and supersedes or amends several of the revenue recognition requirements in FASB ASC 605, Revenue Recognition, as well as guidance within the 900 series of industry-specific topics.

As part of the boards’ efforts to converge U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) and IFRSs, the standard eliminates the transaction- and industry-specific revenue recognition guidance under current GAAP and replaces it with a principles-based approach for revenue recognition. The intent is to avoid inconsistencies of accounting treatment across different geographies and industries. In addition to improving comparability of revenue recognition practices, the new guidance provides more useful information to financial statement users through enhanced disclosure requirements. FASB and the IASB have essentially achieved convergence with these standards, with some minor differences related to the collectibility threshold, interim disclosure requirements, early application and effective date, impairment loss reversal, and nonpublic entity requirements.

The standard applies to any entity that either enters into contracts with customers to transfer goods or services or enters into contracts for the transfer of nonfinancial assets, unless those contracts are within the scope of other standards (for example, insurance or lease contracts).

Effective or Applicability Date

The guidance in ASU No. 2014-09 was originally effective for annual reporting periods of public entities beginning after December 15, 2016, including interim periods within that reporting period. Early application was not permitted for public entities, including not-for-profit entities (NFPs) that have issued, or are conduit bond obligors for, securities that are traded, listed, or quoted on an exchange or an over-the-counter market and for employee benefit plans that file or furnish financial statements to the SEC.

For nonpublic entities, the amendments in the new guidance were originally effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2017, and interim periods within annual periods beginning after December 15, 2018.

On August 12, 2015, FASB issued ASU No. 2015-14, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606): Deferral of the Effective Date, to allow entities additional time to implement systems, gather data, and resolve implementation questions. This update allows for public business entities, certain NFPs, and certain employee benefit plans to apply the new requirements to annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim reporting periods within that reporting period. Earlier application is permitted only as of annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2016, including interim reporting periods within that reporting period.

All other entities will now apply the guidance in ASU No. 2014-09 to annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2018, and interim reporting periods within annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2019. Application is permitted earlier only as of an annual reporting period beginning after December 15, 2016, including interim reporting periods within that reporting period, or an annual reporting period beginning after December 15, 2016, and interim reporting periods within annual reporting periods beginning one year after the annual reporting period in which an entity first applies the guidance in ASU No. 2014-09.

Overview of the New Guidance

The core principle of the revised revenue recognition standard is that an entity should recognize revenue to depict the transfer of goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those good or services.

To apply the proposed revenue recognition standard, ASU No. 2014-09 states that an entity should follow these five steps:

  1. 1. Identify the contract(s) with a customer.
  2. 2. Identify the performance obligations in the contract.
  3. 3. Determine the transaction price.
  4. 4. Allocate the transaction price to the performance obligations in the contract.
  5. 5. Recognize revenue when (or as) the entity satisfies a performance obligation.

Under the new standard, revenue is recognized when a company satisfies a performance obligation by transferring a promised good or service to a customer (which is when the customer obtains control of that good or service). See the following discussion of the five steps involved when recognizing revenue under the new guidance.

Understanding the Five-Step Process

Step 1: Identify the Contract(s) With a Customer

ASU No. 2014-09 defines a contract as "an agreement between two or more parties that creates enforceable rights and obligations." The new standard affects contracts with a customer that meet the following criteria:

  • Approval (in writing, orally, or in accordance with other customary business practices) and commitment of the parties
  • Identification of the rights of the parties
  • Identification of the payment terms
  • Contract has commercial substance
  • Probable that the entity will collect substantially all the consideration to which it will be entitled in exchange for the goods or services that will be transferred to the customer

A contract does not exist if each party to the contract has the unilateral enforceable right to terminate a wholly unperformed contract without compensating the other party (parties).

Step 2: Identify the Performance Obligations in the Contract

A performance obligation is a promise in a contract with a customer to transfer a good or service to the customer.

At contract inception, an entity should assess the goods or services promised in a contract with a customer and identify as a performance obligation (possibly multiple performance obligations) each promise to transfer to the customer either

  • a good or service (or bundle of goods or services) that is distinct, or
  • a series of distinct goods or services that are substantially the same and that have the same pattern of transfer to the customer.

A good or service that is not distinct should be combined with other promised goods or services until the entity identifies a bundle of goods or services that is distinct. In some cases, that would result in the entity accounting for all the goods or services promised in a contract as a single performance obligation.

Step 3: Determine the Transaction Price

The transaction price is the amount of consideration (fixed or variable) the entity expects to receive in exchange for transferring promised goods or services to a customer, excluding amounts collected on behalf of third parties. To determine the transaction price, an entity should consider the effects of

  • variable consideration,
  • constraining estimates of variable consideration,
  • the existence of a significant financing component,
  • noncash considerations, and
  • consideration payable to the customer.

If the consideration promised in a contract includes a variable amount, then an entity should estimate the amount of consideration to which the entity will be entitled in exchange for transferring the promised goods or services to a customer. An entity would then include in the transaction price some or all of an amount of variable consideration only to the extent that it is probable that a significant reversal in the amount of cumulative revenue recognized will not occur when the uncertainty associated with the variable consideration is subsequently resolved.

An entity should consider the terms of the contract and its customary business practices to determine the transaction price.

Step 4: Allocate the Transaction Price to the Performance Obligations in the Contract

The transaction price is allocated to separate performance obligations in proportion to the standalone selling price of the promised goods or services. If a standalone selling price is not directly observable, then an entity should estimate it. Reallocation of the transaction price for changes in the standalone selling price is not permitted. When estimating the standalone selling price, entities can use various methods, including the adjusted market assessment approach, expected cost plus a margin approach, and residual approach (only if the selling price is highly variable and uncertain).

Sometimes, the transaction price includes a discount or a variable amount of consideration that relates entirely to one of the performance obligations in a contract. Guidance under the new standard specifies when an entity should allocate the discount or variable consideration to one (or some) performance obligation(s), rather than to all the performance obligations in the contract.

Step 5: Recognize Revenue When (or as) the Entity Satisfies a Performance Obligation

The amount of revenue recognized when transferring the promised good or service to a customer is equal to the amount allocated to the satisfied performance obligation, which may be satisfied at a point in time or over time. Control of an asset refers to the ability to direct the use of, and obtain substantially all the remaining benefits from, the asset. Control also includes the ability to prevent other entities from directing the use of, and obtaining the benefits from, an asset.

When performance obligations are satisfied over time, the entity should select an appropriate method for measuring its progress toward complete satisfaction of that performance obligation. The standard discusses methods of measuring progress, including input and output methods, and how to determine which method is appropriate.

Additional Guidance Under the New Standard

In addition to the five-step process for recognizing revenue, ASU No. 2014-09 also addresses the following areas:

  • Accounting for incremental costs of obtaining a contract, as well as costs incurred to fulfill a contract
  • Licenses
  • Warranties

Lastly, the new guidance enhances disclosure requirements to include more information about specific revenue contracts entered into by the entity, including performance obligations and the transaction price.

Transition Resource Group

Due to the potential for significant changes that may result from the issuance of the new standard, FASB and the IASB have received an abundance of implementation questions from interested parties. To address these questions, the boards have formed a joint Transition Resource Group (TRG) for revenue recognition to promote effective implementation and transition to the converged standard.

Since the issuance of the standard, the TRG has met several times to discuss implementation issues raised by concerned parties and actions to take to address these issues. Refer to FASB’s TRG website for more information on this group and the status of their efforts, including meeting materials and meeting summaries.

Latest Developments

Based on discussions held thus far on individual areas affected by the new standard, the TRG informed the boards that technical corrections are needed to further articulate the guidance in the standard. As a result, FASB has issued updates to clarify guidance on performance obligations, licensing, principal versus agent considerations, and other narrow-scope improvements and practical expedients.

ASU No. 2016-08, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606): Principle versus Agent Considerations (Reporting Revenue Gross versus Net), was issued in March 2016 to clarify the guidance in FASB ASC 606 with respect to principal versus agent. There is little disagreement that an entity who is a principal recognizes revenue in the gross amount of consideration when a performance obligation is satisfied. An entity who is an agent (collecting revenue on behalf of the principal) recognizes revenue only to the extent of the commission or fee that the agent collects. This ASU hopes to eliminate the potential diversity in practice when determining whether an entity is a principal or an agent by clarifying the following:

  • An entity determines whether it is a principal or an agent for each distinct good or service.
  • An entity determines the nature of each specified good or service (including whether it is a right to a good or service)
  • When an entity is a principal, it obtains control of

—  a good or another asset from the other party that it then transfers to the customer;

—  a right to a service that will be performed by another party, which gives the entity the ability to direct that party to provide the service to the customer on the entity’s behalf; or

—  a good or service from the other party that it combines with other goods or services to provide the specified good or service to the customer.

  • Indicators in the assessment of control may be more or less relevant or persuasive, or both, to the control assessment, depending on the facts and circumstances.

Additional illustrative examples are also provided in ASU No. 2016-08 to further assist practitioners in applying this guidance. The effective date of this update is in line with the guidance in ASU No. 2014-09, as amended by ASU No. 2015-14.

ASU No. 2016-10, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606): Identifying Performance Obligations and Licensing, was issued in April 2016 to reduce potential for diversity in practice at initial application of FASB ASC 606, as well as the cost and complexity of applying FASB ASC 606 at transition and on an ongoing basis. When identifying promised goods and services in a contract, this ASU states that entities

  • are not required to assess whether promised goods or services are performance obligations if they are immaterial to the contract.
  • can elect to account for shipping and handling activities as an activity to fulfill promises within the contract, rather than as an additional promised service.

When assessing whether promised goods or services are distinct, this ASU emphasizes the need to determine whether the nature of the promise is to transfer

  • each of the goods or services, or
  • a combined item (or items) to which the promised goods or services are inputs.

With regards to licensing, ASU No. 2016-10 clarifies whether revenue should be recognized at a point in time or over time, based on whether the license provides a right to use an entity’s intellectual property or a right to access the entity’s intellectual property. Specifically,

  • if the intellectual property has significant standalone functionality, the license does not include supporting or maintaining that intellectual property during the license period. Therefore, the performance obligation would be considered satisfied at a point in time. Examples of this type of intellectual property include software, biological compounds or drug formulas, and media.
  • licenses for symbolic intellectual property include supporting or maintaining that intellectual property during the license period and, therefore, are considered to be satisfied over time. Examples of symbolic intellectual property include brands, team or trade names, logos, and franchise rights.

Lastly, ASU No. 2016-10 provides clarification on implementation guidance on recognizing revenue for sales-based or usage-based royalty promised in exchange for a license of intellectual property. The effective date of this ASU is in line with the guidance in ASU No. 2014-09, as amended by ASU No. 2015-14.

In addition to ASU Nos. 2016-08 and 2016-10, ASU No. 2016-12, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606): Narrow-Scope Improvements and Practical Expedients, was issued in May 2016. Topics covered in this ASU include

  • clarification on contract modifications. This amendment permits an entity to determine and allocate the transaction price on the basis of all satisfied and unsatisfied performance obligations in a modified contract as of the beginning of the earliest period presented in accordance with the guidance in FASB ASC 606. An entity would not be required to separately evaluate the effects of each contract modification. An entity that chooses to apply this practical expedient would apply the expedient consistently to similar types of contracts.
  • how to assess the collectibility criterion. The amendment introduces new criteria to meet the collectibility requirement. An entity should assess the collectibility of the consideration promised in a contract for the goods or services that will be transferred to the customer, rather than assessing the collectibility of the consideration promised in the contract for all the promised goods or services.
  • how to report sales taxes and similar taxes. This amendment states that an entity may make an accounting policy election to exclude from the measurement of the transaction price all taxes assessed by a governmental authority that are both imposed on and concurrent with a specific revenue-producing transaction and collected by the entity from a customer (for example, sales, use, value added, and some excise taxes). Taxes assessed on an entity’s total gross receipts or imposed during the inventory procurement process should be excluded from the scope of the election. An entity that makes this election should exclude from the transaction price all taxes in the scope of the election and should comply with the applicable accounting policy guidance, including disclosure requirements.
  • when to measure noncash consideration. This amendment clarifies that the measurement date for noncash consideration is contract inception. If the fair value of the noncash consideration varies because of the form of the consideration and for reasons other than the form of the consideration, an entity should apply the guidance on variable consideration only to the variability resulting from reasons other than the form of the consideration.
  • how to apply transition guidance. This amendment clarifies that a completed contract for purposes of transition is a contract for which all (or substantially all) the revenue was recognized under legacy GAAP before the date of initial application. Accounting for elements of a contract that do not affect revenue under legacy GAAP are irrelevant to the assessment of whether a contract is complete. In addition, the amendment permits an entity to apply the modified retrospective transition method either to all contracts or only to contracts that are not completed contracts.

The effective date of this ASU is in line with the guidance in ASU No. 2014-09, as amended by ASU No. 2015-14.

FASB also issued ASU No. 2016-20, Technical Corrections and Improvements to Topic 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers, in December 2016. These amendments affect narrow aspects of guidance issued in ASU No. 2014-09, including but not limited to, guidance on

  • impairment testing. When performing impairment testing, an entity should consider expected contract renewals and extensions. In addition, the assessment should include both the amount of consideration it already has received but has not yet recognized as revenue, and the amount it expects to receive in the future.
  • additional scope exceptions. The term “insurance” is removed from the scope exceptions of FASB ASC 606 to clarify that all contracts within the scope of FASB ASC 944, Financial Services—Insurance, are excluded.
  • provisions for losses on construction-type and production-type contracts. Such provisions should be determined at least at the contract level; however, an entity can make an accounting policy election to determine the provision for losses at the performance obligation level.
  • disclosure of remaining performance obligations. Optional exemptions from the disclosure requirement are provided for remaining performance obligations when an entity is not required to estimate variable consideration to recognize revenue.

Consistent with the other ASUs, the effective date of ASU No. 2016-20 is in line with the guidance in ASU No. 2014-09, as amended by ASU No. 2015-14.

Conclusion

Upon implementation of the new standard, consistency of revenue recognition principles across geography and industry will be enhanced and financial statement users will be provided better insight through improved disclosure requirements. To provide CPAs with guidance during this time of transition, the AICPA’s Financial Reporting Center (FRC) offers invaluable resources on the topic, including a roadmap to ensure that companies take the necessary steps to prepare themselves for the new standard. In addition, the FRC includes a list of conferences, webcasts, and other products to keep you informed on upcoming changes in revenue recognition. Refer to www.aicpa.org/interestareas/frc/accountingfinancialreporting/revenuerecognition/pages/revenuerecognition.aspx to stay updated on the latest information available on revenue recognition.

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