Index – Doing Agile Right

 

Index

Note: Figures and tables are indicated by f and t, respectively.

  • Canon, 36
  • capabilities
  • agile success and, 174
  • cross-functional teams and, 150–151
  • open-market competition for, 153–154
  • career paths, in agile enterprises, 28–29, 33, 139–140
  • center of excellence, transition to agile and, 60–61
  • Central Coast Wineries, 184
  • Chandler, Alfred D., Jr., 128
  • change
  • benefits and costs of, 76f, 78, 80f
  • responding to over following a plan, 191f, 194–196
  • change deficiency, 76–77
  • change excess, 77–81
  • change levers, for backlog of agile leadership team, 89, 90
  • chaos, danger of, 3, 6–7, 12, 107, 129
  • chaotic business systems, 77
  • chapters (as at Spotify), 70, 126
  • Chatham House Rule, 164, 220n1
  • cloud-based architecture, 171
  • coaching, talent development and, 138, 187
  • communication
  • by agile leadership teams, 106
  • strengthening among agile teams, 106
  • culture
  • agile leadership and change in, 110
  • at Amazon, 167
  • defined, 198
  • comparative advantage in managerial context, 101, 102
  • compensation and rewards, 139–141
  • confirmation bias, 18
  • Constellation Wines, 184
  • contingency theory, 13
  • converged backlogs, 157
  • copying, creating an agile enterprise and, 126
  • costs
  • agility and lower, 78
  • efficiency, 78–79
  • organizational, 79
  • transition, 78
  • cross-functional teams
  • agile teams as, 53
  • for processes and technology, 144–145, 161
  • matrix organization and, 12–13, 178
  • crowdsourcing, 41
  • Crystal, 38, 65
  • customer centricity, 168
  • customer engagement and satisfaction, agile teams and improved, 42
  • customer engagement favored over rigid contracts, in agile leadership team’s manifesto, 191f, 193–194
  • customer input and feedback, 102
  • agile enterprises and gathering, 115
  • agile teams and, 43
  • customer needs, defining business units and, 129–130
  • customer opportunities, agile systems and changing, 179–180
  • customers
  • agile focus on, 40
  • Amazon’s obsession over, 168–169, 173–174
  • as best judges of what they want, 101–102
  • exploring through user stories, 55–56
  • front-line employees as, 88
  • persistent teams and, 118–119
  • sequencing transition to agile enterprises and, 58–59
  • as shareholder in agile at scale, 48
  • customer solutions
  • balancing and integrating, 55–56
  • opportunities aligning with business processes and technology, 149f
  • working backward from, 150–152
  • data, in agile enterprise, 199–200
  • Dell, Michael, 112
  • Dell, use of agile, 47
  • approach to customer service and cost effectiveness, 114
  • planning at, 112–116
  • reviewing plans and budgets, 122–123
  • Dell Agenda, 113–114
  • Dell Management Model (DMM), 112, 114–116
  • Dell Technologies, 112
  • Deming, W. Edwards, 36
  • Denner, Volkmar, 52
  • departmental silos, IT departments and, 155–156
  • design thinking, 41
  • development and career paths, agile teams and, 28–29, 33, 139–140
  • DevOps, 67
  • DevSecOps, 158, 200
  • dictator-in-crisis myth, 105–106
  • digital customer solutions, 156–157
  • Disciplined Agile Delivery (DAD), 66
  • Dynamic-Systems-Development Method (DSDM), 38, 65
  • Easel Corporation, 37
  • Eastman Kodak, 77
  • eBay, 171
  • Einstein, Albert, 87
  • “Embracing Agile” (Rigby et al.), 39
  • empiricism, agile and, 201
  • employees
  • building trust with leaders over time, 99–100
  • front-line, as customers, 88
  • learning by doing things themselves, 98–99
  • sequencing transition to agile enterprises and, 58–59
  • employee satisfaction and engagement, agile teams and, 2, 42
  • Energy Project, 21
  • engineering practices, improved, 157
  • enterprise backlog, 56
  • Enterprise Scrum, 66, 67
  • ESPN, 75
  • Executive Action Team, in Scrum@Scale, 69
  • executive committee, agile transformation and reconstitution of, 102–103
  • Executive MetaScrum Team, in Scrum@Scale, 69
  • experiments, agile innovation and learning from, 151–152
  • Extreme Programming (XP), 38, 65, 66
  • Gallup, 21
  • Gandhi, Mohandas, 10
  • Gantt chart, 88
  • Garton, Eric, 138, 141
  • Gebhardt, Anne Kathrin, 108
  • GE (General Electric), 160
  • Goldberger, Jason, 168, 169–170, 172–173
  • Golden Mean, 13
  • golden mean, agile, 76f, 79–80
  • Goldman, Steven L., 38
  • Google
  • culture of, 167
  • Project Aristotle, 21
  • use of agile, 47, 156
  • Gresham’s law, 3
  • Gripen jet, incorporation of agile methods in development of, 2, 4, 39, 45
  • guilds (as at Spotify), 70, 126
  • Habito, 143
  • Haier, use of agile, 4, 47
  • Harley-Davidson, 38
  • harmonization, 51, 53, 62, 89, 193, 190
  • at Dell, 123
  • Harvard Business Review, 36, 39, 187
  • hierarchical authority, virtue of in some contexts, 6
  • Hieronymi, Felix, 52–53
  • Hoffman, Dennis, 114
  • Honda, 36
  • human-centered design, 145
  • humility, leaders developing, 56, 63, 105
  • Inc. 500, 99
  • individuals and interactions favored over processes and tools, in agile leadership team’s manifesto, 190–192, 191f
  • ING Netherlands, wholesale implementation of agile at, 10–11, 47, 59
  • initiative owner (product owner), 41, 154
  • initiatives
  • backlog of, 113, 115
  • focus and sequence of, 115
  • welcoming unplanned, 117–118
  • innovation.
  • agile at scale and time to release, 49–50
  • agile process and, 1–2, 143–147
  • agile teams and, 40, 53, 175, 177–178
  • agile vs. traditional, 19–20, 19f
  • balancing with operations, 7–8, 53, 154
  • balancing with stability, 123
  • budgeting for, 116–121
  • effect on business results, 201, 203–205
  • funding innovative initiatives at Amazon, 172
  • happiness and, 186
  • harmonizing with bureaucracy, 7–8, 62–65
  • learning from experiments, 151–152
  • process, 152–154
  • research papers on improving business results through, 19f
  • scaling and, 130
  • technology, 154–158
  • innovation departments, Spotify Model and, 71
  • inputs, measuring agility and, 84f, 85–86
  • interdependencies, planning for, 60–62
  • “Internally created methods” framework, 66
  • investment opportunities, backlog of, 117–118
  • Ironman World Championship, 73–75, 81, 91
  • IT departments
  • departmental silos and, 155–156
  • going agile in more places than, 202, 203, 212–214
  • issues with complexity, 148
  • research papers on agile working beyond, 19f
  • use of agile, 1
  • IT services vendor models, 158
  • Ivarsson, Anders, 70
  • Jane’s (military analyst), 2
  • job architecture, simplifying at agile companies, 139
  • jobs, in agile enterprises, 199
  • John Deere, incorporation of agile methods, 1, 39
  • Lampert, Edward S., 4
  • Large Scale Scrum (LeSS), 66
  • layoffs, agile restructuring and, 4–5, 48, 88–89, 165
  • leadership team, agile manifesto and, 189–196. See also agile leadership
  • lean, 159–160
  • lean product development (lean start-up), 159, 160
  • lean production systems (Lean Six Sigma), 159–160
  • Lean Management framework, 66
  • learning
  • agile leadership teams accelerating learning loops, 107
  • welcoming and celebrating, 177
  • Lego, use of agile, 47
  • Liebert, Carl, 57–58
  • lightweight development methods, 13–14, 38
  • Lis, Anne, 140
  • location strategy, revised, 158
  • Lovallo, Dan, 80
  • Maffetone, Phil, 74
  • management system, 198
  • Manifesto for Agile Software Development, 14, 38–39, 189
  • Mankins, Michael, 138, 141
  • Martella, Erik, 184
  • Matheson, Les, 143–147
  • matrix choices, customer needs and, 129
  • matrix organizations, agile teams and, 12–13, 178
  • McEwan, Ross, 143
  • McGregor, Douglas, 95, 99–100
  • measurement systems, agile leadership teams and shift in, 107
  • measuring agility, 83–87, 84f
  • metrics, to measure agility, 83–87, 84f
  • micromanagement, agile and, 9, 26, 82, 174
  • microservices, at Amazon, 170
  • Microsoft
  • approach to performance management and rewards, 141
  • use of agile, 47
  • mindset, agile, 40
  • mission, agile and, 82
  • Mission Bell Winery, incorporation of agile methods, 39
  • MIT’s Center for Collective Intelligence, 21
  • modular architecture, 157, 158
  • modular capabilities, designing operations as, 152–153
  • modules, coordinating and integrating, 60
  • multitasking, avoiding, 50, 115
  • Murphy, Julie, 136–137
  • Musk, Elon, 77–78
  • Nagel, Roger N., 38
  • National Public Radio, use of agile, 4, 39
  • Netflix, use of agile, 1, 47
  • Net Promoter scores, 120, 147, 154
  • “The New New Product Development Game” (Nonaka & Takeuchi), 36–37
  • Nexus, 66
  • Nonaka, Ikujiro, 36–37
  • PayPal, use of agile, 47
  • people. See under talent
  • performance management and rewards, 139
  • persistent teams (product teams), 12, 118–119, 124, 151, 160–161
  • pilot agile teams, 108
  • Pinkham, Chris, 171
  • plan-do-study-act (PDSA) cycle, 36, 37
  • planning, agile, 32–33, 112–116, 124
  • best practices, 124
  • defined, 198
  • revisiting and adapting, 115–116
  • planning fallacy, 80
  • Polaroid, 77
  • Porter, Michael, 165
  • “The Power of Small Wins” (Amabile & Kramer), 187
  • predictions, accuracy of, 81, 182
  • Preiss, Kenneth, 38
  • The Princess Bride (film), 3–4
  • The Principles of Scientific Management (Taylor), 8–9
  • processes, agile, 29–32, 34
  • aligning customer solutions, technology, and business, 149f
  • challenges of, 147–150
  • identifying problem and processes leading to it, 185
  • working backward from customer solutions, 150–152
  • process innovation, 152–154
  • design operations as modular capabilities, 152–153
  • open-market competition for capabilities, 153–154
  • Procter & Gamble, 144
  • productivity
  • inspired employees and, 138
  • performance management and rewards and, 141
  • product management method, 159, 160–161
  • product owner (initiative owner), 41, 154
  • product review, 34–35
  • product teams, 12, 161
  • funding, 118–119
  • program management office, transition to agile and, 48, 60–61
  • Project Aristotle, 21
  • project teams, 118
  • prototyping, 42
  • purpose
  • defined, 197
  • determining your, 81–83
  • measuring agility and, 83, 84f
  • Saab, use of agile methods in development of Gripen fighter jet, 2, 4, 39, 45
  • Salesforce, use of agile, 47
  • SAP SE, use of agile, 45–46
  • Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe), 66, 67–68, 179
  • scaling agile, 27–28, 45–72
  • agile at scale, 48–51
  • agile enterprise, 51–54
  • chapter takeaways, 72
  • creating agile vision and strategy, 54–62
  • defined, 47
  • examples, 45–47
  • harmonizing bureaucracy and innovation, 62–65
  • innovation and, 130
  • meaning of, 47–54
  • planning for interdependencies, 60–62
  • Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe), 67–68
  • scaling agile frameworks, 65–71
  • Scrum@Scale, 68–70
  • sequencing the transition, 58–60
  • taxonomy of teams, 56–58
  • scenario-based funding, 120–121
  • scientific method, 18, 36
  • Schlatmann, Bart, 59
  • Schwaber, Ken, 37
  • Scott, Dave, 75
  • Scrum (framework), 65, 66, 179
  • Scrum Inc., 66
  • Scrum master, 94, 140
  • Scrum methods, 37–38
  • Scrum@Scale (Scrum of Scrums), 66, 68–70, 179
  • Sears, agile as euphemism for layoffs at, 4
  • self-managing teams, agile and, 1. See also agile teams
  • self-reflection, agile leadership and, 97
  • senior executives
  • in agile enterprise, 51–52
  • missteps in approaching agile transformations, 87–88
  • need for executives to be on board with agile, 31–33, 35
  • scaling agile and, 9–10, 14
  • sequencing transition to agile enterprise, 58–60
  • Shapiro, Mary, 21
  • Shewhart, Walter, 36
  • Shouraboura, Nadia, 173–174
  • Sidky, Ahmed, 121–122
  • Silver Lake Partners, 112
  • 60 Minutes (television program), 77–78
  • skunkworks, 37
  • software development
  • adaptive (ASD), 38
  • agile and, 1, 29, 34, 154–158, 161–162
  • issues with traditional approach, 148
  • Scrum methods, 37–38
  • software systems, built as microservices, 152
  • Sparrow, Tammy, 62
  • specialization, excessive software, 155
  • Spotify
  • attempting to copy, 5, 11, 12
  • incorporation of agile methods, 1, 47, 156
  • organizational chart, 126, 127f
  • Spotify Model, 66, 70–71
  • sprints
  • agile teams’ use of, 28–29, 31, 34, 36, 41
  • celebrating wins, 187
  • as device to harmonize the organization, 63, 65
  • purpose of, 44
  • squads (as at Spotify), 70, 126
  • stability, balancing innovation and business, 123
  • stack ranking system, 141
  • stand-ups (meetings), 93, 94, 109
  • Standish Group’s chaos study, 20
  • start-ups
  • agile and, 14
  • chaotic business systems and, 77
  • strategy
  • creating agile, 54–62
  • defined, 197
  • essence of, 165
  • operating model following, 128–129
  • Stripe, talent acquisition at, 138
  • success
  • as habit, 186
  • pathways to, 81–87
  • Superforecasting (Tetlock & Gardner), 81
  • support and control functions, transformed, 158
  • Sutherland, Jeff, 37, 38, 39, 68
  • Takeuchi, Hirotaka, 36–37, 39
  • talent acquisition, 138–139
  • talent engine, in agile enterprise, 199
  • talent gaps, filling on agile teams, 28, 29, 33
  • talent management, in agile enterprise, 125, 134–141, 142
  • talent strategy, 134–141
  • bringing in new talent inspired by mission, 138–139
  • business strategy informing, 135
  • defined, 199
  • dynamic resourcing and career paths, 139–140
  • fostering leadership, not just management, 137–138
  • talent system, 136–137
  • defined, 199
  • Target Corp., use of agile, 47
  • agile budgeting and, 116–117
  • taxonomy
  • of opportunities, 149f
  • of teams, 56–58, 149f, 151
  • Taylor, Frederick Winslow, 8–10, 95
  • teaching others, mastering skills through, 187–188
  • team-based performance measures, 141, 147
  • technical talent, upgraded, 157
  • technology
  • in agile enterprise, 199–200
  • aligning with business practices and customer solutions, 149f
  • challenges of agile, 147–150
  • rethinking at Amazon, 170
  • working backward from customer solutions, 150–152
  • technology architecture, for agile, 29–30, 34, 155, 157, 158
  • technology innovation, 154–158
  • Tesla, 77–78
  • testing working models, 176
  • Tetlock, Phil, 80–81
  • Theory X, 95
  • Theory Y, 13, 95, 99–100
  • 3M
  • Corporate Research Systems Lab, 62
  • Health Information Systems, 62
  • use of agile, 1, 47
  • Time, Talent, Energy (Mankins & Garton), 138–139
  • Toyoda, Sakishi, 184–185
  • Toyota Industries, 184
  • Toys “R” Us, 77
  • trade-offs, 12, 65, 78–79, 103, 129, 153, 160
  • training philosophies, Ironman competition example, 73–75, 91
  • transition costs, 78
  • transparency, of agile teams, 100
  • Triathlete magazine, 75
  • tribes (as at Spotify), 70, 126
  • Trussle, 143
  • trust
  • agile transformation and mindset of, 105
  • building trustworthiness between leaders and employees, 99–100
  • in employees to do the job right, 98–99
  • Twitter, 156
  • value
  • different way of adding, 102–104
  • how leaders add, 97–102
  • values, agile enterprise’s, 197
  • venture capitalist, agile funding procedures resembling, 116
  • virtual services, Amazon’s, 171
  • vision, creating agile, 54–62, 105
  • vulnerability testing, 51
  • Wagner, Sebastian, 46
  • Walmart, talent system at, 136–137
  • Warby Parker, 82, 83
  • waterfall process, 51, 148
  • Weber, Max, 6–7
  • Welch, Jack, 182
  • Willis Towers Watson, 21
  • Wilson, Fred, 182
  • Windows Vista, 141
  • wins, creating and celebrating, 186–187
  • Woelders, Frans, 146
  • work, agile and modularizing, 34
  • working solutions favored over excessive documentation, in agile leadership team’s manifesto, 191f, 192–193
  • work in process (WIP), agile mindset and, 41
  • workplace trust, 99–100
  • Xerox, 77
  • yin and yang of business, 53, 54f