Index – Information Consulting

Index

A

accounts receivable, 47–8
agent fee, 83
anxiety, 19
Appendix
Case studies
change management through the thesaurus development, 151–5
client acquisition with more effective order registering, 160–4
holistic and organised approach to appropriate information consumption and sharing, 172–5
information professional projects on current awareness bases, 155–60
intelligence system at the Corruption Prevention and Strategic Information Secretariat, 176–84
managing information and customer care centre, 165–8
process management approach for information management reorganisation, 168–72
Association of Independent Information Professionals
Code of Ethical Business Practice, 60
Code of Ethics for CI Professionals, 60
Statement of Policy Concerning Intellectual Property Rights, 59
audit, 119
availability, 20–1

B

bank account, 48
business development, 27
business ethics, 60–1
business partners, 54–5
business philosophy, 33
business plan, 31–55
clients, 36
company description, 33
competition, 37–9, 40
competitive analysis, 40
costs, funding, and fees, 44–5
credit policies, 49–55
balance sheet, 50–1
business partners, 54–5
receivables ageing, 49
start-up expenses, 51–4
distribution channels, 42
economics, 34–5
pricing, 41
product, 35
products and services, their features and benefits, 34
promotion, 39, 41
sales forecast, 42–4
start-up expenses, 45–8, 51–4
managing accounts receivable, 47–8
targeted business sector, 36–7
business savvy, 26

C

career-driven programmes, 125
Cattell’s 16 personality factors, 139–40
client-consultant relationship, 4
client perspective
advice to future consultants, 142–6
actual work as it progressed, 144–5
consultant orientation on the problem and project aim, 143
deliverables and their effect, 145–6
determining the project strategy, 144
interaction and communication, 145
successful and productive relationship, 131–46
consultant selection, 134–6
use of motivation, 133–4
top five list of consultant qualities, 136–41
Cattell’s 16 personality factors, 139–40
communication skills, 137
creativity and problem-solving capability, 137
Employers’ demands, 141
goal-oriented, 137
no delays in communications, 137
professionalism, 136
client relations, 21–2, 27
contracts, 88–92
confidentiality agreement, 91–2
determining budget scope, 82–6
acquiring knowledge to accomplish the task, 82–6
determining how much to charge, 84–6
key to success, 77–105
delivering the deliverables: report, presentation, discussion, 100–1
formal proposal, 87–8
handling invoice issues, 101–2
helping the client’s decision, 92–3
informal inquiry, 78–9
preliminary discussions, 79–80
preliminary memorandum, 81
request for proposal: to bid or not to bid, 78
meeting and building relations, 94–100
dealing with organisational culture, 98
interacting with client’s staff, 95–7
keeping the client informed of progress, 98–100
signature in hand, 93–4
paper trail, 94
wrap up and setting up for the future, 103–4
levels of customer relations, 104
clients, 36
Code of Professional Conduct, 61–2
cold-calling, 72
company goals, 33
company objectives, 33
competition, 37–9, 40
competitive analysis, 40
Competitive Intelligence Division, 123
complaint-handling, 73
consultants
feedback, 149–50
‘professional friendships’, 110
veterans advise, 107–13
agreeing to deliverables vs delivering in advance, 107–8
belief in own qualifications and abilities, 113
conflict with client’s best interest, 111
coping with the disappointment, 112–13
encountering concerns outside the official project scope, 109
keeping integrity, 108
losing objectivity, 110
maintaining pose and neutrality, 108
protecting the trust of client staff, 110
‘recycling’ of work, 112
unfore, 109
seen circumstances working with clients in the same industry, 111–12
consulting personality, 27–9
skills need, 28–9
contracts, 88–92
confidentiality agreement, 91–2
copyright, 59–60
core competencies, 33
corporate politics, 15–16
cost effective serviced offices, 23–4
costs, 44–5
creative commons (CC), 59
credit card, 48
credit policies, 49–55
balance sheet, 50–1
business partners, 54–5
receivables ageing, 49
start-up expenses, 51–4
crisis communication, 73

D

deliverables, 100–1
‘difficult’ clients, 21–2
direct costs, 44–5
fixed costs, 44
variable costs, 44–5
distribution channels, 42

E

earnings, 16–17
economics, 34–5
electronic promotional brochure, 73–5
employee experience, 15
ethics See business ethics
European Federation of Management Consultancies Associations, 61
expectation management, 14

F

financial planning, 24
fixed costs, 44
flexibility, 20–1

G

GLOBE, 121
graphical image design, 69

H

Hofstede, 121

I

information auditing, 118–19
information business, 27
information consultancy
client relations, 77–105
contracts, 88–92
delivering the deliverables: report, presentation, discussion, 100–1
determining budget scope, 82–6
formal proposal, 87–8
handling invoice issues, 101–2
helping the client’s decision, 92–3
informal inquiry, 78–9
meeting and building relations, 94–100
preliminary discussions, 79–80
preliminary memorandum, 81
request for proposal: to bid or not to bid, 78
signature in hand, 93–4
wrap up and setting up for the future, 103–4
information consultant, 2
Code of Professional Conduct, 61–2
librarian, 115–29
culture factor, 120–3
demand assessment, 117–20
doing things differently, 115–17
expectations and perceptions in professional education, 124–6
expert practitioner to consultancy, 123–4
repositioning of profession and schools, 127–9
roles, 1–3, 6
roles and activities, 7–10
information consulting, 1–10
advantages, 13–17
earnings, 16–17
freedom from corporate politics, 15–16
freedom to ‘pick and choose, ’ 16
satisfaction from leveraging experience, 15
sense of control over one’s time, 13–14
sense of reward from helping clients, 14–15
building trust and marketing services, 65–75
creating and maintaining image, 68–70
electronic promotional brochure, 73–5
professional visibility, 70–1
understanding client ideas and aims, 67–8
word-of-mouth, 72–3
challenges, 19–30
consulting personality, 27–9
cost effective serviced offices, 23–4
degree, 26–7
difficult clients, 21–2
finances, 24
flexibility and availability, 20–1
part-time or subcontract, 25
proposed location, 22–4
qualities, 29
uncertainty and anxiety, 19
uneven workloads, 20
information professional, 4–5
possible roles, 6
scope of roles and activities, 7–10
three ‘streams’
client relations, 27
launch and management of information business, 27
marketing and sales/business development, 27
information professional, 4–5, 116, 149
intellectual property, 59–60
International Council of Management Consulting Institutes, 61–2
invoice handling, 101–2

L

legislation, 57–63
Code of Professional Conduct of the information consultant, 61–2
ethics and quality, 60–1
intellectual property and copyright, 59–60
liability, 58
liability, 58
librarian
culture factor, 120–3
competitive attitudes within stable and challenging environments, 122
skills and competencies, 118–20
cooperation with other information professionals, 119
deriving the knowledge from the client’s business functions, 118–19
librarians as independent information professionals, 120, 122
managing an entrepreneurship, 120
possible cultural orientations, 122
taking a leap as an information consultant, 115–29
demand assessment, 117–20
doing things differently, 115–17
expectations and perceptions in professional education, 124–6
expert practitioner to consultancy, 123–4
repositioning of profession and schools, 127–9
line of credit, 47–8
location criteria, 22–4
log routine, 48

M

marketing, 27, 65–75
creating and maintaining image, 68–70
electronic promotional brochure, 73–5
professional visibility, 70–1
understanding clients, 67–8
word-of-mouth, 72–3
marketing strategy, 66
Master of Library Science (MLS), 26, 124
mission statement, 33

N

non-disclosure agreement (NDA), 91

O

organisational culture, 98
ownership, 33

P

part-time jobs, 25
pricing, 41
products, 34, 36
professional associations, 71
professional image, 68–70
professional visibility, 70–1
promotion, 39, 41
public relations, 67, 70

Q

quick studies, 29

R

ramp-up, 25
receipt, 48
receivables ageing, 49
referral fee, 78–9
reliability, 21
request for proposal (RFP), 78
reward, 14–15
role orientation, 123

S

sales forecast, 42–4
scoop creep, 21
self-assessment, 29
services, 34
skills, 27–9
SLA Annual Conference in Denver (2007), 123
Society of Competitive Intelligence Professionals, 60
staff time, 45
start-up expenses, 45–8, 51–4
strategic pragmatism, 125
subcontracting
discretionary, 25
identified after the fact, 25
open, 25

T

targeted sector, 33, 36–7
time, 13–14
Trompenaars, 121
trust, 65–75

U

uncertainty, 19

V

value adding, 1–2
variable costs, 44–5
veterans advise, 149
tips and considerations, 107–13
agreeing to deliverables vs delivering in advance, 107–8
belief in own qualifications and abilities, 107–13
conflict with client’s best interest, 111
coping with the disappointment, 112–13
encountering concerns outside the official project scope, 109
keeping integrity, 108
losing objectivity, 110
maintaining pose and neutrality, 108
protecting the trust of client staff, 110
‘recycling’ of work, 112
unfore, 109
seen circumstances working with clients in the same industry, 111–12

W

word-of-mouth, 72–3
Working Knowledge: How organisations manage whatthey know (1998), 116
workloads, 20