Index – Information Literacy and Cultural Heritage

Index

A

4MAT, 113 See also learning styles
A2K, 38 see also access in libraries
Aboriginal
cultural knowledge, 54, 66–7
resources, 48
access
in archives, 24
to the Internet, 47, 52–4
in libraries, xxii–xxiv, 38
ACRL Information Literacy Competancy Standards for Higher Education, 85–90
adapting the model, 136–43
ad hominem, 98, 104
African
example of cultural sensitivities, 100–1
oral tradition as a source of history, 105
rights to cultural heritage, 54
African National Congress See ANC
ANC, 100–1
ancestral, 22
anthropology, 2
ANZIL (Australian and New Zealand Information Literacy) Framework, 90–1
apartheid, 11, 19–20, 27–8, 36–8
appraisal, 23, 26
Arab Spring, 60
archives
access, 24
contested history, 9–12
fever, 26
identity, 28
interface, 24–5
justice, 28–9
memory, 9–17, 26, 28–9
and postmodernism, 22–4, 27
power, 24
records, 26–9
representation, 24, 27–8
arguments, 97–9, 102–6, 147
art, 2, 4, 66, 100–1, 148–9
artifacts, 2, 49
Asia, 21, 50, 140–1
assumptions, 29, 38, 81, 100, 103–4
attitudes and values, 99–100, 125, 130
augmented reality, 66, 143
Australia, 48, 51, 54–5, 66–7
Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders Studies, 48
Austrian National Library, 48
authority, 20, 65–6, 78, 98–102
cultural responses towards, 78, 98–102
of museums, 20
social responses to, 65–6, 67–9

B

bandwidth, 52–3, 166
behavior and activity, 125–6, 130–1
behaviorist approaches, 107, 110–11
bias, 35–7, 88
binary code, 42
Bleek, Wilhelm, 17
blogs, 45–7, 121 See also social media
Boolean logic, 145, 167
British Library, 48, 61–2
Bushmen See San

C

calendars, 121, 128
carrier
UNESCO definition of, 7, 120–1, 130, 132, 144
Castells, Manual, 58–61
castles of cards, 104
catalysts, 119–20, 127, 133
Catholic University of America, 158
causality, 99
censorship, 11, 32–3, 35–7
ceremonies, 121, 128, 148
classification, 14, 30, 35
Clearwater Marine Aquarium, 158
cognitive processes, 79, 81, 100
collections, 32, 38, 120–1
in archives, 24–5
and bias, 12–13
in libraries, 6–8
in museums, 14
colonialism, 14
communities, 3, 61
community, 51, 54–6
exclusion, 19, 58, 66
inclusion, 18–21, 48, 58
and museums, 17–21
components, 120–2, 128, 132 See also carrier content context
concept mapping, 110
conflict, 5, 15, 26, 59–60
Congress of South African Trade Unions See COSATU
connoted messages, 105
constructive feedback See feedback
constructivist approach, 78–83, 107, 108
container, 49
content, 121, 128
contested history, 12, 13–21, 22–9, 32
context, 1–9, 121–2, 128
contextual fluidity, 126, 131
convergence
museums, archives and libraries, xxiv, 59, 117, 153–61
copyright, 52–7
core processes and tasks, 122–4, 129–30
COSATU, 101
course delivery, 121, 129
courses, 143–51
create, 123, 129–30, 148
Creative Commons licensing, 57
critical thinking, 97–105
crystallized intelligence, 115
cultural
artifacts, 2, 105
backgrounds, 34, 96, 108, 114
biases, 112, 118, 122, 128
capital, 2
commodity, 55–6
diversity, 3, 33–4, 60
imperialism, 4–5
production, 2
sensitivity, 97–106
cultural heritage
in archives, 22–30
definitions and concepts, 1–8
in the digital domain, 42–51, 65–6
documentary, 7–9
intangible, 2–3, 34, 45–6
in libraries, 6, 30–8
in museums, 13–22
tangible, 3, 8, 14
culture
moral rights, 53–7
in world affairs, 3–4
cultures of practice, 70, 121, 128
curation, 22
cyberculture, 41, 43–4
cyberspace, 34, 41, 43, 51

D

databases, 38, 42, 50, 76, 86, 121, 128
deconstruction, 13, 22, 147
Deep Web, 49
defacement, 101
democracy, 11, 22, 28, 75–6, 157
Derrida, Jacques, 13, 23, 26–7
Dewey Decimal Classification system, 30
dialectical synthesis, xxi, 155
didactic expository theory of learning, 95, 111
didactic learning, 107, 144
digital
heritage, 65–6
information fluency, 77
resources, 48
digital cultural communication, 50–1
digital divide, 25, 41–2, 52–3
digital domain, 51–5
social responses to, 57–69
Digital Imaging South Africa, 48
digital information contexts, 41–2, 71, 95
Digital Information Fluency Model (21CIF), 77–8, 92–3
Digital Library of Dutch Literature, 48
digital preservation, xxi–xxii, 45–50
Digital Shikshapatri, 48
Digital Songlines, 54, 66
digitization, xxi–xxii, 44–8, 50, 54
disabilities, 141–2
discover, 122, 129–30, 144
discovery theory of learning, 96
discrimination, 33, 58
disinformation, 37, 64
display, in the context of museums, 11, 14, 17, 50
District Six Museum, 19
documentary heritage, 7–8, 36, 54
Dunedin Fine Art Center, 158

E

educational psychology, 115
Egypt, 142
electronic
databases, 38, 48
era, 25
network communication technologies, 58–9
Enjoyment, inspiration, creativity, 126, 130
epistemologies, 27
esoteric knowledge, 18
ethical use of information, 54–7, 70, 85, 89–91, 93, 122, 129
ethnic identity, 19
ethnicity, 12, 17, 19
ethnology, 2
EUscreen, 159
evaluate, 86, 123, 129–30, 147
exclusion, 18, 21, 24, 38, 53, 58–60
exhibitions
in archives, 25–6
in libraries, 32, 51
in museums, 11, 13–22, 50–1
eyewitness testimony, 11–12, 105–6

F

Facebook, 63, 68
facilitators, 120, 122–7, 129
false dichotomy, 99
feedback, 124, 129–30, 141, 149
finding aids, 23–4, 129–30
flora and fauna, 17
fluid intelligence, 115–16, 125, 130
focus groups, 151
forgetting, 10–11, 15, 26–30
Foucault, Michel, 13, 23, 61, 63
free-choice learning See learning

G

gender, 14, 24
generic learning outcomes, 109, 114–15, 124–6, 130–1
genocide, 19, 28
globalization, 5, 33, 60

H

hacker ethic, 57
humanism, 46

I

identification, 28, 84, 88
identity, 1, 4, 12, 19, 23–9, 59–61
IFLA, 140, 153, 158–9
Multicultural Library Manifesto, 33–5
images, 7, 42–6
Indian stereotyping, 16
indigenous knowledge, 9, 18, 121
indirect learning, 108
informal learning, 78, 108
information flux, 41–2, 61–4
information literacy, 6–8, 12–13, 41–2, 49, 51–4
definitions and concepts, 71–3
model of information literacy and cultural heritage for lifelong learning, 119–31
models of stages and processes, 73–83
21CIF Digital Information Fluency Model, 77–8
Kuhlthau’s Information Search Process Model, 78–83
Pappas and Tepe’s Pathways to Knowledge Model, 75–7
Stripling and Pitts Research Process Model (REACTS), 74–5
The Big6™, 74
models of standards, competencies and performance indicators, 83–94
21CIF Digital Information Fluency Model, 92–3
ACRL Information Literacy Competancy Standards for Higher Education, 85–90
ANZIL (Australian and New Zealand Information Literacy) Framework, 90–1
SCONUL Seven Pillars of Information Literacy, 83–5
UNESCO Information Literacy Indicators, 93–4
information seeking, 78–83
instructors, 122, 129 See also facilitators
intellectual property, 42, 54–7, 89, 125, 131
interactives, 112–13
interfaces, 24–5
International Federation of Library Associations See IFLA
Internet, 25–6 See also digital domain
interpretations, 12, 14, 20–1, 27, 50
interviews, 10, 138, 171–2
Iraq, 35

K

Khoisan, 17 See also San
knowledge and understanding, 125, 130–1
knowledge economy, 74, 109
Kuhlthau’s Information Search Process Model, 78–83

L

Labriola National American Indian Data Center, 48
language, 3–4, 33, 45, 48, 139
Latin America, 139
learners, 122–4, 129–30
learning
analytic, 113–14
behaviorist approach to, 107, 110–11
common-sense, 113–14
constructivist theory of, 108, 110–13
didactic expository theory of, 111–12
discovery theory of, 112–13
dynamic, 113–14
environment, 77, 114, 119, 129, 168
free-choice, 106–9
imaginative, 113–14
measurement of, 110 See also personal meaning mapping (PMM)
positivist approach to, 110
stimulus-response theory of, 111–12
styles, 113–14
learning outcomes See generic learning outcomes
learning styles, 108–15
legal deposit, 61–2
liberation struggles, 36–7
libraries
academic, 31
access and A2K, 38
and censorship, 32, 35–7
and classification, 30
and collection development, 32
digital, 47–8
and memory, 32–3
and multiculturalism, 33–5
political influences on, 32
and positivism, 30
and postmodernism, 30–1
Library of Congress, 62
lifelong learning, 106–15
literature, 2, 6, 9, 37–8, 138–9
literature reviews, 137
Lloyd, Lucy, 17
Luthuli, Chief Albert, 9

M

marginalization, 5, 19, 24
Marxism, 4
materiality, 3, 14, 29, 45, 118
media literacy, 56, 72–3
media studies, 41, 44, 146
archival, 10–12, 24–6
collective, 12
declarative, 10
episodic, 10
erasure, 26
forgetting, 10–11
historical, 12
in libraries, 32–3
long-term, 10
personal, 12
procedural, 10
remembering, 10–11
retrieval of, 19
sensory, 10
short-term, 10
social, 22, 29
Memory of the World Programme see UNESCO Memory of the World Programme
Mexico, 16, 18
migration, 33, 48, 139
misrepresentation, 106, 150
Model of Information Literacy and Cultural Heritage for Lifelong Learning, 119–26, 127–32
applying the model, 143–51
models of information literacy See information literacy
modernity, 4
modify, 124, 129–30, 150
monuments, 2
moral rights, 54–7
Moscow Declaration on Media and Information Literacy, 72–3
multiculturalism, 1, 33–5, 78
museum interactives, 112–13
Museum of Te Papa, New Zealand, 21
museums
and community, 18–20
and cross-cultural perspectives, 21–2
and ethnography, 15–17
interactives, 112–13
and lifelong learning, 106–10
and materiality, 14
and memory, 14–15, 19
and nationalism and national identity, 19
and natural history, 15
and new media, 49–50
and postmodernism, 13–14
and representation, 16–17
and theories of learning, 111–12
music, 7, 42, 121, 128, 145
Myspace, 63

N

narratives, 11, 14, 16, 20, 26–8
National English Literary Museum, 37
national identity, 12, 19, 32
national liberation struggles See liberation struggles
National Library of Scotland, 49
National Library of Singapore, 140
nationalism, 5, 19
nation states, 5
Native Americans, 15
networked society, 58–9, 63
New Zealand, 48, 72, 91
non sequitur, 99
North America, 16

O

objects, 3, 8
in museums, 15–16
as sacred, 21–2
OCLC, 153, 157
online
exhibitions, 24–6, 48, 159–60
intellectual property, 56–8
moral rights, 53–5
surveillance, 62–5
oral history, 10, 25, 105–6
oral tradition, 3, 34, 105

P

P2P See peer-to-peer
Panopticon, 61, 63
Pappas and Tepe’s Pathways to Knowledge Model, 75–7, 133
paradigm shift, 47
patriotism, 12, 19
pattern recognition, 102–3
pedagogy, 6
peer-to-peer, 56
perceptions, 12, 20, 23
performance indicators, 87–91 see also information literacy models of standards competencies and performance indicators
personal meaning mapping (PMM), 110, 126, 131, 151
pluralism, 5
political systems and influence, 8, 11–13, 18–21, 23–9, 32–3
positivist notion of archives, 28
post-apartheid, 17, 20
post hoc ergo propter hoc, 99
postmodernism, 1, 8, 13, 22–3, 27, 30–1, 43, 79, 83, 118
poverty, 37, 52, 101
Princeton University, 157
privacy, 61–5
processes, 122–4, 129–30
propaganda, 35–7, 43, 103–4
protocols, 54–5, 59
public opinion, 28

Q

qualitative research, 137
quantitative research, 138
Queensland Stories, 51
Questions to Google, 30

R

race, 12, 14, 58, 174
records
archival, 22–3, 26–9
destruction of, 11, 27
reliability, 109, 110, 138
remembering, 9–13, 15–16, 23–9
repatriation of human remains, 121, 128
representation, 4–5, 16, 20, 24, 44, 118, 122, 128
research design, 136–8
research methodology, 136–8
rituals, 3, 8, 66–7, 123, 130
Robben Island Museum, 21

S

Sagan, Carl, 97–9, 103
sampling, 99, 137
San, 17
SCONUL Seven Pillars of Information Literacy, 83–5
search strategies, 83, 91, 122, 129, 145
secrecy, 18, 29
Semantic Web, 143
sexuality, 12
share, 123, 129–30, 149
Shoah Archive, 48
skills
computer literacy, 47, 51–3
critical thinking, 97–105
generic learning outcomes, 124–5, 130
information literacy, 71–3, 83–94
information literacy and cultural heritage, 34, 122–4, 128–30, 144–50
measurement of, 83–93, 109–10
sleight of hand, 104
Smithsonian Institution, 157
social behavior, 8, 57–69
social customs, 47, 121, 128, 150
social inclusion, 48
social media, 5
blogs, 45
as carrier, 121
community, 5
legal desposit problems, 62–3
training in, 123, 128–9, 148–9
use in political activism and subversion of authority, 60, 66, 67–70
social memory, 11–12, 15, 22–3, 28–9, 32
sociology, 14
sousveillance, 64
South Africa, 11–12, 16–17, 19, 21, 26–7, 36–8, 53, 101–2
spirits, 22
spreadsheets, 77, 145
standards, 83–90
State Library of Queensland, Australia, 51
stereotyping, 17, 28, 104
stimulus-response theory of learning, 111–12
straw man, 4, 99
Stripling and Pitts Research Process Model (REACTS), 71, 75
surveillance, 61–4
survey questionnaires, 137–8, 163–9

T

taboos, 35, 102–3
Tarpon Springs Cultural Center, 158
tautology, 105
The Big6™, 74
The Spear, 100–2
Tlali, Miriam, 37–8
tradition See oral tradition
training
in accommodating people with disabilities, 141–2
in critical thinking, 95, 102
information literacy and cultural heritage processes and tasks, 122–4, 129–32, 143–50
information literacy skills, 31, 51, 72
learning styles, 113–16
in museums, 108–10
transmission, 25, 114
transparency, 62, 64
trauma, 11
Truth and Reconciliation Commission, 11
Twitter, 62–3, 67–70

U

UNESCO, 5, 7–9, 41–5, 72–3, 135, 156, 159
Charter on the Preservation of Digital Heritage, 65–6
convention concerning the protection of the world cultural and natural heritage, 2–3
convention for the safeguarding of the intangible cultural heritage, 2–3
information literacy indicators, 93–4
Memory of the World Programme, 7, 47–8, 65
and WikiLeaks, 67–70
University of Edinburgh, 157

V

validity, 12, 75, 109–10
Victoria and Albert Museum, 157
virtual heritage, 50, 55
virtual museums, 41, 43, 49–50, 120–1, 128

W

weasel words, 99
Web 2.0, 47
WikiLeaks, 41, 64, 67–9, 99
worldview literacy, 96, 115–16, 125, 130, 161
World Wide Web, 42, 49, 76

Y

Yale University, 157

Z

Zuni, 18