Index – Practicing Management

administrative skills, 58–59

American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business, 42

analytical intelligence, 57

Association of MBAs, 128

Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business, 128

Bloom, N., 9–10, 47–50, 78

Bloom and Van Reenen’s management process, 9–10

budgeting as management function, 6

Caldas, M., 122–125

Cameron, K., 42, 45–50, 61–62, 64–67

Cameron and Whetten’s skills of effective managers, 45–50

cellular organization, 54–55

checking, EMS, 106

cognitive skills, 59

commanding as managerial function, 34–35

communication among committees, 117

communication skills, 59

compliance risk, 115

conceptual skills, 44

contingency theory, 52–53

controlling as management function, 3

controlling as managerial function, 36–38

coordinating

activities, 4

as management function, 6, 36

management processes in developing countries, 160–162

creating and maintaining trust, 5

creative intelligence, 57

customer relationship management system (CRM), 89

design skills, 45

developing countries

applicability of western management theories to, 120–129

challenges for managers in, 133

availability of capital and credit, 138–139

infrastructure conditions, 134–135

macroeconomic environment in, 137–138

market uncertainties, 135–137

political systems and institutions, 139–141

production capabilities,
133–134

cultural conditions, 149–150

emergence of new global competitors from, 129–130

ethics and corporate social responsibility, 148–149

issues in, 121–122

management processes in, 150–155

coordinating, 160–162

leading, 159–160

organizing, 157–158

planning, 155–157

staffing, 158–159

management training in, 162–163

overview of, 119–120

planning by managers

access to reliable information, 142

quality of human capital, 143–146

role of natural resources, 146–148

technological level in, 142–143

as testing grounds for new management theories, 131–132

value of management study in, 132

dimensions of management styles, 75–79

directing as management function, 3, 6

divisional structure, 53

documentation, QMS, 96

EH&S management systems. See environmental, health and safety management systems

EMS. See environmental management system

encouraging continuous learning, 4

enterprise risk management, 113–117

infrastructure, 116

risk identification and assessment program, 116

types of risk exposures, 115

environmental, health and safety (EH&S) management systems

elements for, 111–113

ISO 45001 and, 109–113

environmental management system (EMS)

best practices for implementation of, 106–109

checking, 106

elements of, 101–102

implementation and operation, 104–105

ISO 14001 and, 100–101

planning, 103–104

policy, 103

environmental policy, 103

ethics and corporate social responsibility, 148–149

executive-level management, 55

facilitating decision-making processes, 4

Farashahi, M., 125–129

Fayol, Henri, 2, 5–6, 11, 27, 35, 36, 39, 150

Fayol’s primary functions of management, 5–6

financial risk, 115

first-line managers, 21–22

folklore and facts about managerial roles and activities, 12–13

front-line managers, 55

functional managers

versus general managers, 18

responsibilities of, 18–19

functional structure, 53

general managers

functional managers versus, 18

responsibilities of, 19–20

Hafsi, T., 125–129

Harris’ multi-factor analysis, 50–57

hazard risk, 115

human capital, quality of, 143–146

human skills, 44

implementation and operation, EMS, 104–105

incentives management, 49–50

informational roles, 15–16

infrastructure conditions, 134–135

International Monetary Fund, 125

International Organization for Standardization (ISO), 90

interpersonal roles, 13–15

interpersonal skills, 59

ISO 9001 and QMS, 97–100

ISO 14001 and EMS, 100–101

ISO 45001 and environmental, health and safety (EH&S) management systems, 109–113

ISO standards for management system, 90–92

Katz, R., 42–43

Khandwalla, P., 74, 88

categories of management styles, 79–80

defined management style, 72

Koontz, H., 3, 31, 43, 45, 151

Lau, A., 43

leadership skills, 59

leading, management processes in developing countries, 159–160

levels of management, 20–21

Mackenzie, R., 6–9

Mackenzie’s 3-D model of management process, 6–9

macroeconomic environment, 137–138

management

Fayol’s primary functions of, 5–6

incentives, 49–50

levels of, 20–21

monitoring, 48

science, 52

targets, 48–49

management competency models, 58–59

management functions, 3

management process

Bloom and Van Reenen’s, 9–10

in developing countries

coordinating, 160–162

leading, 159–160

organizing, 157–158

planning, 155–157

staffing, 158–159

Mackenzie’s 3-D model of, 6–9

management skills

Cameron and Whetten’s skills of effective managers, 45–50

conceptual skills, 44

design skills, 45

Harris’ multi-factor analysis, 50–57

human skills, 44

Katz’s model, 42–43

management competency models, 58–59

managerial intelligence, 57

technical skills, 43

training, 59–70

traits and characteristics for, 41

management styles

delegating style features, 82

dimensions of, 75–79

formal, 74

key features, 79–80

Khandwalla defined, 72

Khandwalla’s categories of, 79–80

national, 87–88

organic vs. mechanistic, 74

Quang and Vuong definition of, 72

Reddin’s 3-D, 73–74, 80–87

Thornton’s “big 3,” 80–82

management system

elements of, 89

enterprise risk management, 113–117

environmental, health and safety (EH&S), 109–113

guidelines for establishing, 92

ISO standards for, 90–92

organizational context, 93–94

management training in developing countries, 162–163

managerial competencies, 40

managerial intelligence, 57

managerial roles and activities

commanding, 34–35

controlling, 36–38

coordinating, 36

decisional roles, 16–18

first-line managers, 21–22

folklore and facts about, 12–13

functional versus general managers, 18

informational roles, 15–16

interpersonal roles, 13–15

key roles and duties, 4–5

levels of management, 20–21

management functions, 3

middle managers, 23–24

Mintzberg’s “Management Roles,” 10–11

models of, 2–5

organizing, 31–34

planning, 27–31

primary functions of managers, 26–27

responsibilities of functional managers, 18–19

responsibilities of general managers, 19–20

top-level/senior managers,
24–26

managerial tasks, models of, 55–56

managers

best practices for managers emerge from international study, 47–50

Cameron and Whetten’s skills of effective, 45–50

challenges for, in developing countries, 133

characteristics of effective, 45–47

as decision maker, 16–18

first-line, 21–22

middle, 23–24

planning by, 142

primary functions of, 26–27, 150–151

simple assessment tools for, 68–70

tasks and skills of effective, 60–68

top-level/senior, 24–26

using autocrat style, 85–86

using benevolent autocrat style, 86

using bureaucrat style, 85

using compromiser style, 86

using deserter style, 84–85

using developer style, 85

using executive style, 86

using missionary style, 85

manager’s planning activities and skills, 30–31

manager’s “skill set,” 42

managing alignment, 4

managing in developing countries. See developing countries

market uncertainties, 135–137

matrix structure, 54

middle-level managers, 23–24, 55

Mintzberg, H.

list of self-study questions, 68–70

“Management Roles,” 10–11

modernized performance appraisal techniques, 146

monitoring management, 48

national management styles, 87–88

natural resources, role of, 146–148

network organizations, 54

occupational/technical skills, 59

operational planning, 28–29

operational risk, 115

organizational context, 93–94

organizational effectiveness measurement, 75

organizational performance, 45, 90

organizational structure

cellular, 54–55

divisional structure, 53

functional structure, 53

matrix structure, 54

models of managerial tasks, 55–56

network organizations, 54

team based, 54

organizing, 33

as management function, 3, 6, 31–34

management processes in developing countries, 157–158

Pavett, C., 43

personal adaptability skills, 59

personal motivation skills, 59

planning

EMS, 103–104

as management function, 3, 6, 29–31

management processes in developing countries, 155–157

operational, 28–29

strategic, 28

tactical, 28

political systems and institutions in developing countries, 139–141

practical intelligence, 57

preventive maintenance management (PMM), 89

production capabilities, 133–134

Punnett, B., 130, 152–155, 157, 159–160

quality management system (QMS), 92

evaluation and improvement for, 97

ISO 9001 and, 97–100

leadership for, 94

operational activities for, 96

organizational context, 93–94

planning for development of, 94–95

resources and support for, 95–96

quality of human capital, 143–146

Quang, T., 72–77

definition of management styles, 72

Reddin, W., 73–74, 82–87

3-D management styles, 82–87

reporting as management function, 6

reputational risk, 115

risk committee responsibilities, scope of, 117

risk governance with strategy, alignment of, 117

risk management infrastructure, 117

simple assessment tools for managers, 68–70

skill(s)

administrative, 58–59

analysis, 65–66

application, 66

leadership, 59

learning, 65

personal adaptability, 59

personal motivation, 59

practice, 66

preassessment, 65

technical, 43

Social Learning Theory, 64

staffing, 31, 33

as management function, 3, 6

management processes in developing countries, 158–159

stakeholders, need of, 116–117

strategic planning, 28

strategic risk, 115

SWOT analysis, 28

systems theory, 52

tactical planning, 28

targets management, 48–49

teaching management skills, 64

team based organizational structure, 54

team building, 41

technical skills, 43

technological level in developing countries, 142–143

Thornton, P.

“big 3” management styles, 80–82

top-level/senior managers, 24–26

trainable behavioral components, 47

training, management skills, 59–70

Van Reenen, J., 9–10, 47–50, 78

Vuong, N., 72–77

definition of management styles, 72

Weihrich, H., 21, 29, 33–35, 38, 43, 45, 78

western management theories

convergence perspective, 122

to developing countries, 120–129

divergence perspective, 121

situational theory, 122

universal perspective, 121

Whetten, D., 42, 46–47, 61–62, 64–67

Wood, T., 122–125

World Bank, 125

World Trade Organization, 126