Index – Special Libraries as Knowledge Management Centres

Index

A

American Library Association, 12–13
Ask a Librarian service, 145, 148, 161

B

balanced scorecard, 265–7, 288
Bell, D., 67, 69
benchmarking, 49
‘best practices’, 250
bibliographic instruction, 21–2, 240
blogs, 165

C

capture tools, 104
case studies, 282–93
Central Bank and Financial Institutions Librarians’ mailing list, 283–4
knowledge management at the Oesterreichische Nationalbank, 289–93
knowledge management strategy at the Financial Services Authority, 287–9
knowledge-sharing approaches in the United Nations, 284–7
case study, 41
centre for business knowledge, 139
chief information officer (CIO), 156, 219
chief knowledge officer (CKO), 157, 219, 272
classification, 151
codification, 81, 86–7, 137
collections, 28-30
‘common-pool resources, ’ 137
commons, 2
communication and collaboration tools, 104
communities of practice, 99, 169–72, 238–9
advantages, 175–7
functions, 174–5
organisation, 172–4
degree of institutionalised formalism, 173
environment, 173
geographic dispersion, 174
knowledge-sharing culture, 173
leadership, 173
member enrolment, 174
member selection, 174
members’ information and communication technologies, 174
organisational sponsorship, 173
topics’ relevance to members, 174
Competencies for Information Professionals of the 21st Century, 32–4, 65, 124, 141–2
consumption subsystem, 76
content management, 129, 136
Cooperative Online Resources Catalogue (CORC), 158
core knowledge assets, 101
covert knowledge brokers, 195, 201
current awareness services, 160 See also selective dissemination of information
customer analysis, 40–1

D

DARWIN, 282
data, 64–74
Davenport, T., 96
de Stricker, U., 135
Delicious, 166
Dewey, M., 7–8
Dewey Decimal Classification System, 7
dialogue, 95
Dialogues, 95
document management systems (DMS), 162–3
Drucker, P., 88
Dublin Core metadata, 158
Duncan, W.J., 75
dynamic knowledge assets, 101

E

E-prints in Library and Information Science (E-Lis), 162
eBIS forum, 282
electronic journals, 163–4
electronic records management systems (ERMS), 162–3
Enterprise 2.0, 165
Enterprise Web 2.0, 165
explicit knowledge, 81–6

F

Facebook, 165
Flickr, 166
folksonomy, 87
frequently asked questions (FAQs), 161
funding, 43

G

GrapeVINE, 233

H

HTML/XML publishing tools, 236
human capital, 63, 102, 290
human networks, 86

I

IDEAS, 162
individual knowledge, 68
infomediaries, 190
informal learning, 254
informal training, 140
information, 64–74
‘information age, ’ 189
information and communication technologies (ICT), 171, 174, 232–3
information audit, 218
information management, 61
information mediators, 261
information professionals, 5, 31–2, 132, 138–9, 140, 197, 203, 258, 285, 299, 300 See also special librarians
information-sharing, 90
information technology, 156
information technology department, 209
innovation, 105
innovation capital, 290
instant messaging, 166
institutional repositories, 149–50
intellectual capital, 63, 101–3, 199
Intellectual Capital Report model, 293
internal portal, 153–6
Internet, 23–5
intranet, 153–6, 285
iSeek, 285

J

Johnson, E.M., 123
‘just-for-you’ model, 19
‘just-in-case’ model, 19

K

KM 2.0 models, 280
knowledge
agents, 87–9
codification, 86–7
continuous creation process, 89–90
vs information and data, 64–74
‘knowledge age, ’ 189
knowledge application, 286
knowledge appraisal, 270
knowledge assets, 101–3
categories, 101
knowledge brokers, 261
knowledge collaboration, 286
knowledge creation, 130, 286
knowledge culture, 6
knowledge dissemination, 160
knowledge economy, 195
Knowledge for Development, 67
knowledge gap, 125–6
knowledge leaders, 258
knowledge management, 3–6, 50–1, 57–112, 122, 124, 137–8, 215, 277–8
benefits, 107–9, 251–61
organisation, 251-7
special library, 257–61
characteristics, 74-80
goals, 79-80
principles, 77–9
components, 80-105
agents of knowledge, 87-9
codification of knowledge, 86–7
communities of practice, 99
continuous cycle of the knowledge-creation process, 89–90
dialogue, 95
innovation, 105
knowledge assets/intellectual capital, 101–3
knowledge-sharing, 90, 92–4
mutual trust, 99–100
people, 96–8
tacit and explicit knowledge, 81–86
technology, 103–5
concept, 59–64
knowledge vs information and data, 64–74
organisational learning, 128–9
performance measurement, 264–5
external measurement, 265
inferred value measurement, 265
internal measurement, 265
personal knowledge management, 105–7
processes, 217
project evaluation, 262–71
steps to project implementation, 109–11
strategy, 215–9
tools and technologies associated with cycle, 91
knowledge management audit, 230
knowledge management benefits scorecard, 289
knowledge management centre, 3, 125, 136–44, 180, 261, 299–300
case studies, 282–93
implementation at a special library, 187–242
change management, 209–11
changing attitudes at organisational level, 211–15
communities of practice, 238–9
internal co–operation, 237–8
pilot project phase, 228–32
system security, 235–6
technology embedded, 232–5
user education and training, 239–42
knowledge management team, 219–22
knowledge manager, 220–2
lessons learned, 250–1
maintenance, 277
project evaluation, 262–4
promotion and marketing, 271
special librarians, 189–204
challenges for, 189–95
competencies needed for the project, 195–201
professional and personal development of, 206–4
special libraries, 131–44
literature review, 132–6
reasons for centre establishment, 136–44
steps for implementation of the centre at a special library, 222–8
considerations before starting, 223–5
getting started, 225–8
strategy, 215–19
success factors, 236–7
support from parent organisation management, 204–9
things to avoid, 275–7
things to consider, 272–5
the way forward, 277–82
knowledge management project, 3, 129, 145–6, 255, 256, 267–70
knowledge management strategy, 287–9
knowledge management system, 3, 249–93
benefits, 251–61
organisation, 251–7
special library, 257–61
case studies, 282–93
Central Bank and Financial Institutions Librariansmailing list, 283–4
Financial Services Authority, 287–9
Oesterreichische Nationalbank, 289–93
United Nations, 284–7
communities of practice, 169–72
advantages, 175–7
functions, 174–5
organisation, 172–4
components, 146–77
Ask a Librarian service, 161
electronic journals, 163–4
embedded technology, 156–8
institutional repositories/knowledge repositories, 149–50
intranet, 153–6
online public access catalogue, 158–9
online resources, DMS, and ERMS, 162–3
publications on various disciplines, 162
records management, 159
search engine, 150–1
selective dissemination of information, 159–61
taxonomy, 151–3
Web 2.0 technologies, 164–9
components at a special library, 121–80
goal and purpose, 254–5
lessons learned, 250–1
performance measurements types, 264–5
external, 265
inferred value, 265
internal, 265
project evaluation, 262–71
project types, 145–6
promotion and marketing of the centre, 271
roots, 122–5
sharing internal knowledge, 177–9
significance for parent organisations, 125–30
special libraries for knowledge management centres, 131–44
knowledge management team, 219–22
knowledge managers, 200, 220–2, 258, 289, 299, 301
knowledge map, 178–9
‘knowledge nexus, ’ 125
knowledge organisation system (KOS), 152
knowledge professional, 132
knowledge repository, 149–50, 272
knowledge resource centre, 139 See also special libraries
knowledge services, 35
knowledge-sharing, 90, 92–4, 111, 140, 173, 177–8, 255, 262, 273, 284–7
Knowledge Sharing Centre, 287
knowledge systems, 75
knowledge transfer, 93–4
knowledge wave, 279
knowledge work, 88
knowledge worker, 88
knowledge workers, 191, 221
Koenig, M., 143

L

librarians, 299
library, 122
Library 2.0, 165
Library and Knowledge Sharing Centre, 285
library instruction, 141
library manager, 44–5
Library of Congress, 7
Library of Congress Subject Headings, 152
library performance, 47–50
library users, 26–8
LinkedIn, 165
linking function, 76
Livelink, 157
local knowledge, 80
Lotus Notes, 156
low-value knowledge assets, 101

M

mailing list, 283–4
Marion, G.E., 122–3
marketing, 38–42
meta-search tools, 104
metadata, 86, 153
microblogs, 165
mutual trust, 99–100
MyLibrary, 160
MySpace, 165

N

needs analysis, 218
networking, 52
New York Public Library, 8
Nonaka, I., 64, 81

O

O’Dell, C., 57–8, 110, 225
Office of Information and Communications Technology, 284–5
OLISnet, 282
Online Computer Library Centre, 158
online public access catalogue (OPAC), 158–9
online resources, 162–3
open-minded management, 206
organisational culture, 212, 213
organisational knowledge, 68
organisational learning, 128–9

P

periodicals collection, 29
personal competencies, 33–4, 196
personal knowledge management (PKM), 106–8, 132–3
photo tools, 166
Placements and Salaries, 30–1
Plato, 95
Polanyi, M., 84
Post-Capitalist Society, 88
practice subsystem, 76
Pradt Lougee, W., 134, 170, 259–60
professional competencies, 32–3, 196
Prusak, L., 61, 65, 222, 256

R

Really Simple Syndication (RSS) feeds, 166
records, 30
records management, 159
reference assistance, 21–2
reference librarians, 191
reference services, 21–2
relational capital, 290
research library, 9
Research Papers in Economics, 162
research subsystem, 75
risk-taking, 93

S

Sandpoint systems, 233
search engine, 150–1
selective dissemination of information (SDI), 159–61
SharePoint, 157
sharing internal knowledge, 177–9
Skype, 166
Smith, R., 96, 143
social bookmarking, 166
social knowledge network, 281
social library, 132, 168, 258, 281–2
social networking, 165, 166, 280
Social Science Research Network, 162
‘Socratic’ method, 95
special librarians, 4–6, 189–204
challenges, 22–3, 189–95
competencies and skills, 30–7
competencies needed, 195–201
interpersonal proficiencies, 202–3
new roles, 200–1
professional and personal development, 201–4
traditional role, 190
Special Libraries, 123–4
Special Libraries Association, 124, 131, 253
special libraries association, 12–14
special library, 1–52, 128, 255–99, 305–6
benefits of knowledge management, 257–61
characteristics, 14–17
clientele, clients, users, 26–8
co-operation, 51–2
collections, 28–30
definition, 2–4
funding, 43
history, 6–9
knowledge management, 48–9
knowledge management centre implementation, 187–242
challenges for special librarians, 189–195
change management, 209–11
changing attitudes at organisational level, 211–15
communities of practice, 238–9
competencies needed by special librarians for the project, 195–201
internal co-operation, 237–9
knowledge management strategy, 215–9
knowledge management team, 219–22
pilot project phase, 228–32
special librarians professional and personal development, 201–4
steps for implementation, 222–8
success factors, 236–7
support from parent organisation management, 204–9
system security, 235–6
technology embedded, 232–5
user education and training, 239–42
knowledge management system, 121–80
components, 146–77
project types, 145–6
sharing internal knowledge, 177–9
significance for parent organisations, 125–30
special libraries for knowledge management centres, 131–44
lessons learned, 250–1
library manager staff relations, 46–7
library performance, 47–50
marketing, 38–42
mission, 6
relation with parent organisation, 43–6
services, 17–23
traditional to knowledge management, 23–5
vs other kinds of libraries, 9–12
spiral of knowledge, 84–5
storytelling, 179
strategic alignment, 44
strategic learning, 239
strategy, 215
structural capital, 63, 102, 290
supportive knowledge assets, 101

T

tacit knowledge, 81–6
taxonomy, 86, 151–3
technology, 103–5, 138, 156–8, 232–5, 276
The Library Journal, 17, 123
thesaurus, 156, 233
transferring knowledge, 273
Twitter, 165

U

UK Defence Evaluation and Research Agency (DERA), 135, 235
Understanding Knowledge as a Commons:From theory to practice (2007), 73

V

video tools, 166
virtual communities of practice, 171

W

Wagner-Doebler, R., 69
Web 2.0, 164–9, 280
Wikipedia, 165
wikis, 165
World Development Report, 67

Y

YouTube, 166