Kirsty Carter A Practice for Every day Life London United Kingdom – I Used to Be a Design Student

LONDON, ENGLAND

Kirsty Carter (A Practice for Everyday Life)

PROFESSIONAL YEARS

9

A VALUABLE QUALITY FOR A DESIGN STUDENT + A DESIGN PROFESSIONAL

To explore + To keep exploring

FAVOURITE FOOD NOW

…never cut, it was always my top priority. I perhaps eat out a little more now. In terms of favourites, it has always been chocolate

YOUR MOST VALUED POSSESSION NOW

Documenta 5 poster by Ed Ruscha in 1972 – it’s my favourite piece of graphic design.

YEAR OF PROJECT

2010/11

PROFESSIONAL PROJECT BRIEF

Exhibition Histories book series. To produce 15 books, each dedicated to a contemporary art exhibition since 1955, publishing 3 books per year and feeling like a book series with a target audience of academics, curators and students.

CLIENT

Lucy Steeds, Teresa Gleadsowe, Pablo Lafuente, Charles Esche (Afterall Books)

COLLABORATOR(S)

A Practice For Everyday Life (the whole studio was involved in some shape or form)

I love that he made type up out of little ants

TECHNOLOGY

Adobe InDesign, Photoshop

TYPEFACE

Adobe Garamond Regular, Adobe Garamond Italic, Neuzeit Office Bold, Neuzeit Office Italic, Neuzeit Office Regular

WHY DO YOU LIKE THIS PROJECT?

This was one of my favourite projects we produced in 2010 – the series seems to sum up our passion, love and interest in contemporary art. The research/history and our growing knowledge of this subject is what perhaps makes our studio somewhat specialist in this field. This is one of the first publications we have designed that is now printing its 2nd edition; I am sure that is a sign of success!

DO YOU TEACH?

I have never had a regular teaching position at any college, but I have been a visiting lecturer and lectured at many. One or two years into A Practice for Everyday Life, we were regularly asked to teach, but we (Emma Thomas and I) both felt we weren’t ready to teach then and how much knowledge we could really pass on at that point. Now it’s perhaps a different story. We did and still do often teach in the capacity of lecturing and workshops. I have taught at many different institutions and different kinds of students all over the world. We love this way of teaching, where you can set workshops, give a huge amount of enthusiasum and input into a brief to get the students thinking; it makes us excited to see what they will produce. The only trouble is that we never build up a relationship with any of the students, which I am sure is where the real joy begins!

IS IT POSSIBLE TO TEACH DESIGN?

Of course! I think it is an incredible education, a design education. It was time to evolve, experiment, research, collect, investigate and learn. Some of my teaching was quite formal; we learned typography formally at Brighton in workshops about ‘Typographic detailing’ but also had time to just explore my concepts. At the Royal College I had access to an incredible library of books and periodicals and other designers’ archives. I would have never had this without a design education. Throughout my education I had conversations, dialogues and critiques with some of the most inspiring design practitioners, which I learned a lot from, both what I wanted to be and want I didn’t want to be. But most importantly, I was taught by the great people around me – the fellow design students I was at college with.