List of Figures – SharePoint 2010 Site Owner's Manual: Flexible Collaboration without Programming

List of Figures

Chapter 1. Leveraging the power of SharePoint

Figure 1.1. The Office Ribbon is now included in SharePoint.

Figure 1.2. Media web part, which can be embedded in SharePoint pages

Figure 1.3. In-context collaboration lets you quickly collaborate with your peers.

Figure 1.4. Ratings configured for a document library

Figure 1.5. Hello World site that we’ll use as our first example of a SharePoint site

Figure 1.6. The Site Actions menu is found on all pages of a SharePoint site. Highlighted are two key links: View All Site Content and Site Permissions.

Figure 1.7. The All Site Content page is the hub for all content that you can use on your pages.

Figure 1.8. Site permissions groups and permission levels

Chapter 2. A deeper dive into SharePoint capabilities

Figure 2.1. SharePoint is an umbrella term, which can include one or more of the editions listed. It’s important to know what version you have in order to understand the functionality that’s accessible to you.

Figure 2.2. Logical structure for SharePoint. This diagram displays the breakdown of components and their hierarchical relationships. To start, users will access the World Wide Web or intranet, which connects to SharePoint servers. Hosted on those servers will be a series of site collections broken into subsites. Anything above the dotted line will be managed by your server administrator and networking team. This book covers the components that you can access below the dotted line.

Chapter 3. Creating sites using site and list templates

Figure 3.1. An example site that displays four web parts that each display snippets of data from the lists that compose the site

Figure 3.2. Document Library functionality for an item

Figure 3.3. Document Library functionality for the library

Figure 3.4. Picture Library with context menu displaying the different options

Figure 3.5. You can select certain pictures in a Picture Library and present them in slide show format.

Figure 3.6. Example of a Picture Library slide show web part with the configuration options

Figure 3.7. Asset Library

Figure 3.8. Media web part

Figure 3.9. Announcements list with rich Silverlight editing options in action

Figure 3.10. Contacts list

Figure 3.11. Links list

Figure 3.12. Calendar list

Figure 3.13. A calendar overlay combines the events from multiple calendars and color codes them.

Figure 3.14. Example of textual format of current events

Figure 3.15. Tasks list with rich Silverlight editing options in action

Figure 3.16. Discussion Board list

Figure 3.17. Survey list with rich Silverlight editing options in action

Figure 3.18. Out-of-the-box SharePoint Foundation site template for a team site

Figure 3.19. Out-of-the-box SharePoint Foundation site template for a blank site

Figure 3.20. Out-of-the-box SharePoint Foundation site template for a Document Workspace site

Figure 3.21. Out-of-the-box SharePoint Foundation site template for a blog site, with sample data

Figure 3.22. Out-of-the-box SharePoint Foundation site template for a group work site

Figure 3.23. Out-of-the-box SharePoint Foundation site template for a Basic Meeting Workspace

Figure 3.24. Out-of-the-box SharePoint Foundation site template for a Blank Meeting Workspace

Figure 3.25. Out-of-the-box SharePoint Foundation site template for a Decision Meeting Workspace

Figure 3.26. Out-of-the-box SharePoint Foundation site template for a social meeting workspace

Figure 3.27. Out-of-the-box SharePoint Foundation site template for a Multipage Meeting Workspace

Figure 3.28. Out-of-the-box SharePoint Server site template for an Enterprise Wiki

Figure 3.29. Out-of-the-box SharePoint Server site template for a My Site host

Figure 3.30. Out-of-the-box SharePoint Server site template for a Personalization Site

Figure 3.31. Out-of-the-box SharePoint Server site template for a Publishing Site

Figure 3.32. Out-of-the-box SharePoint Server site template for a Visio Process Repository

Figure 3.33. Out-of-the-box SharePoint Server site template for a Basic Search Center

Figure 3.34. Out-of-the-box SharePoint Server site template library for an Enterprise Search Center

Figure 3.35. Out-of-the-box SharePoint Server site template for a Business Intelligence Center

Figure 3.36. Out-of-the-box SharePoint Server site template for a Document Center

Figure 3.37. Document Center enhanced features

Figure 3.38. Out-of-the-box SharePoint Server site template for a Records Center

Figure 3.39. Out-of-the-box SharePoint Server site template library for a FAST Search Center

Figure 3.40. PowerPoint Broadcast Center

Figure 3.41. Out-of-the-box SharePoint Server site template library for an Assets Web Database

Figure 3.42. Out-of-the-box SharePoint Server site template library for a Charitable Contributions Web Database

Figure 3.43. Out-of-the-box SharePoint Server site template library for a Contacts Web Database

Figure 3.44. Out-of-the-box SharePoint Server site template library for an Issues Web Database

Figure 3.45. Out-of-the-box SharePoint Server site template library for a Projects Web Database

Chapter 4. Setting up a document collaboration site

Figure 4.1. The solution that will be implemented in this chapter is based on the requirements specification and business priorities.

Figure 4.2. Uploading Selected Pictures dialog box

Figure 4.3. Quick Launch bar after the modifications have been applied

Figure 4.4. Customization options for a list in SharePoint that are available

Figure 4.5. Proposal Reviews homepage in edit mode

Figure 4.6. Web Parts options that display when you begin to customize the home-page of a site

Figure 4.7. How the web parts should be displayed after being reorganized on the page

Figure 4.8. Additional options to modify the Proposals web part are displayed to the right after selecting Edit Web Part.

Figure 4.9. Web part menu options that are available when you’re in edit mode

Figure 4.10. Proposal Reviews site with data entered into the web parts.

Figure 4.11. Proposal Reviews site with filters applied to the connected web parts

Figure 4.12. Site template options when creating a new site

Figure 4.13. Different options available for editing the page within the Ribbon

Figure 4.14. A new tab called Publish will display within the Ribbon.

Figure 4.15. Different options are available for publishing when you create a site based on the Publishing Site with Workflow template.

Chapter 5. Leveraging enterprise content management features

Figure 5.1. The solution that will be implemented in this chapter is based on the required specifications and business priorities.

Figure 5.2. The library with two content types: document and proposal. You can have many more if you choose.

Figure 5.3. If you look at the properties of a document identified as a proposal, you’ll see that it also requests project start and end dates.

Figure 5.4. This screen shows a list of all the information management policy settings that you can work with.

Figure 5.5. Once you’ve associated the information management policy with the content type, all documents that are tagged as a proposal will now show the disclaimer that notifies the user that this document will automatically delete one year after the project completion date.

Chapter 6. Publishing information to the web

Figure 6.1. The solution that will be implemented in this chapter is based on the required specification and business priorities.

Figure 6.2. Travel Arrangements page with the discussion board added at the bottom

Figure 6.3. Survey configuration page for new questions

Figure 6.4. Survey web part to get an idea of attendance of the traveling guests

Figure 6.5. YouTube video with the options selected to get video embed code

Figure 6.6. Embedded YouTube video

Figure 6.7. Out-of-the-box template for a blog site

Figure 6.8. Post page for a blog site. Notice the commenting capabilities that are now displayed.

Figure 6.9. Final blog site after the modifications have been made

Figure 6.10. View of the homepage for an anonymous user

Figure 6.11. View of the homepage for an authenticated user

Figure 6.12. Video and Audio option that’s displayed with SharePoint Server

Figure 6.13. Media web part

Figure 6.14. Additional options for configuring the Media web part

Figure 6.15. Configured Media web part

Chapter 7. Empowering users with business intelligence

Figure 7.1. Homepage of the BI site you’ll be creating for this scenario. This displays Excel data using Excel Web Access.

Figure 7.2. Team Sales dashboard, graphically displaying employee sales and KPIs

Figure 7.3. Top Clients dashboard, graphically displaying commercial data and a subset of information from Excel

Figure 7.4. What your newly created spreadsheet should look like once you’ve

Figure 7.5. The Excel Web Access web part will appear, as shown, once configured.

Figure 7.6. This is how your data should display once you’ve made your edits to Excel.

Figure 7.7. KPIs show a status indicator so you can track employee sales and overall sales goals.

Figure 7.8. Linking Excel Web Access to a named item

Figure 7.9. Creating the Commercials item

Figure 7.10. Creating the SalesData item

Figure 7.11. Creating the Total item

Figure 7.12. Data retrieved for the Chart web part using Excel Web Services

Figure 7.13. Top Clients dashboard displaying commercial sales, and a snapshot of the worksheet information that ties each commercial to a client

Figure 7.14. Team Sales dashboard, graphically displaying each employee’s sales and status against their quota

Chapter 8. Creating application sites with SharePoint Designer

Figure 8.1. Process map for the solution that you’re going to build. This explains the roles of the resource manager and employee. It will help you to visualize the requirements and how the users will advance through the system.

Figure 8.2. Here I’m detailing how the employee will submit the exams that they’ve successfully completed and the process the task will go through for validation from their manager.

Figure 8.3. Once the exam status for the employee has been validated, their name and picture will display on the site so they can receive recognition.

Figure 8.4. SharePoint Designer 2010 has changed a lot since 2007. The numbered callouts correspond to the following explanations of what you can do functionality-wise in each of those sections.

Figure 8.5. This is the list gallery page found in SharePoint Designer 2010. Here you can access all of your lists.

Figure 8.6. The list summary page in SharePoint Designer 2010 lets you manage settings for your list.

Figure 8.7. If you enter a hyperlink in a column and set it to display as a picture it will appear as shown in this image.

Figure 8.8. The web part is formatted to display the name with a different background color based on which exams the employee has successfully completed.

Figure 8.9. Microsoft SharePoint Certification Club site with the two List View web parts added

Figure 8.10. Process for approving an item in a list with content approval enabled

Figure 8.11. To add a web part that’s based on an existing list, you’ll need to select it from the Ribbon, which appears once you select Existing List from the Insert tab.

Figure 8.12. Exam Difficulty Survey web part with information entered

Figure 8.13. Configuration options for the Approval workflow

Figure 8.14. SharePoint Approval workflow in action once configured

Figure 8.15. SharePoint Server solution once implemented

Chapter 9. Collecting and managing data by integrating with InfoPath

Figure 9.1. Process map for the solution that you’re going to build. This explains the roles of the resource manager and the project manager. It will help you to visualize what the requirements are and how the users will advance through the system.

Figure 9.2. Click the New button in the web part to initiate your form. This is what your solution will look like if you choose to initiate the form without Forms Services, which is described in section 9.3.

Figure 9.3. Once a resource manager initiates a request for feedback, an email is generated and sent to the project manager. The project manager will get this request and be able to open the form to fill it out.

Figure 9.4. The form will also be submitted to a SharePoint library so the resource manager can track how many requests they’ve sent and their status. As you can see, the status for your recent request is submitted because it hasn’t been completed.

Figure 9.5. This is what the project manager will receive when they get a request for feedback. Note here that the Open Form option will enable users to open the form from Outlook.

Figure 9.6. If the user is using Outlook 2007 or above when they open the email, it will appear as shown here, and the user will have the ability to complete and submit it without leaving Outlook.

Figure 9.7. This example shows the scenario built out with Forms Services. To the right is the form library that you’ll create, which will display the forms that have been sent out for feedback and returned.

Figure 9.8. Menu options for a list in SharePoint. The List Settings option is selected on the right side of the Ribbon.

Figure 9.9. Ribbon is used often when designing your form. In this image it’s displayed at the top of the page.

Figure 9.10. InfoPath form with a layout table added. This will help you to quickly format the content and get started on your form.

Figure 9.11. InfoPath form with a layout table and section layout added. This will help you to quickly format the content and get started on your form.

Figure 9.12. Color schemes are a quick and easy way to modify the look and feel of an InfoPath form. Here you’ve applied the Civic color scheme.

Figure 9.13. This is the dialog box that will appear for each of the field properties associated with the drop-down list boxes. This will help you provide additional power and logic to your controls.

Figure 9.14. To retrieve data from a SharePoint site you have to create a connection to receive data by configuring the Data Connection Wizard. This will enable you to populate your drop-down list boxes from lists that exist in SharePoint.

Figure 9.15. The drop-down list displayed is dynamically pulling information from a list on your SharePoint site. If you were to add new values to the SharePoint list, they’d automatically appear in the drop-down list.

Figure 9.16. This is what the filter conditions for the Employee field should look like. This will add the logic to your drop-down controls to show only the values that are valid based on the previous selection.

Figure 9.17. Your data source so far should appear like this. Naming your fields with recognizable terms is important when you start to build out forms that have many fields.

Figure 9.18. Your form will look like this once the controls have been added to the page. Exciting to see it in action! Was it really that hard? No, I didn’t think so.

Figure 9.19. Once you’ve added and configured the data source, verify that your form appears like this one. Also, once you run the form, the controls that are marked Required will now have either a red dotted line or an asterisk to denote that they’re required.

Figure 9.20. The rules you set up for your form load should look like these once you’ve completed them. In SharePoint 2010 the rules manager makes it easy to see all your rules in one place.

Figure 9.21. You now have the ability to click the New button in the web part to initiate your form. This step won’t be necessary in the next section using Forms Services. Instead, you’ll display the form in the browser.

Figure 9.22. Enable browser compatibility from InfoPath to verify your design. This will ensure that you have Forms Services. Although you may have SharePoint Server, the site that you’re implementing it on might have that feature turned off.

Figure 9.23. Step in publishing where you’ll need to enable the form to be filled out using a browser. Notice the option here to also publish a form as a site content type. This can be useful if you need to push your template to multiple libraries.

Figure 9.24. The view of the feedback form for the resource manager to request feedback from the project manager is displayed using InfoPath Forms Services. This enables the form to be filled out without having the client version of InfoPath installed.

Figure 9.25. Feedback site with the form displayed on the homepage using the Info-Path Form web part. This way you don’t have to open the form on a different page. It’s automatically displayed for you when you come to the site.

Chapter 10. Reporting and web applications using Access

Figure 10.1. Process map for the solution that you’re going to build. This explains the roles of the IT team and the client. It will help you to visualize what the requirements are and how the users will flow through the system.

Figure 10.2. Navigation form that displays the different reports at the top of the form. Links to manage the input of the data are displayed on the right side of the form.

Figure 10.3. This reservation form captures the start and end dates for hardware reservations that are approved for the clients.

Figure 10.4. Hardware Reservations report by type in layout view. Using this view you can select boxes and move them around and/or resize them until you get the design that you’re aiming for.

Figure 10.5. The Hardware Reservations by Type report can dynamically pull data from the three SharePoint lists and display it as shown.

Figure 10.6. Record Management options in Access 2010 when publishing your tables using web forms

Figure 10.7. The Navigation web form will provide horizontal and vertical menu navigation to allow your end users to navigate between the reports and web forms that you created.

Chapter 11. Pulling it all together with search, My Sites, and cross-site functionality

Figure 11.1. Example of search scope for searching the current site, all sites, or people

Figure 11.2. Example of a user selecting a document and having tagging options displayed

Figure 11.3. Example of a visual thumbnail preview

Figure 11.4. Search configurations

Figure 11.5. Options for creating a Search Center

Figure 11.6. Proposal Reviews site created in chapter 4

Figure 11.7. New Scope option in the Search Scopes settings

Figure 11.8. Creating the Proposals scope

Figure 11.9. Configuration settings for the Proposals scope

Figure 11.10. Settings for the display group

Figure 11.11. Search web parts

Figure 11.12. Advanced Search Box web part

Figure 11.13. Advanced Search Box web part properties

Figure 11.14. Proposal Reviews homepage with the advanced search box added

Figure 11.15. Activating Team Collaboration Lists, so additional options are available on the site

Figure 11.16. Creating an announcements list

Figure 11.17. Modifying the default properties for the announcements list

Figure 11.18. Content Rollup web parts

Figure 11.19. Content Rollup web part properties

Figure 11.20. Setting the content query fields

Figure 11.21. Content query in action

Figure 11.22. RSS web part settings

Figure 11.23. Microsoft SharePoint Certification Club example

Figure 11.24. Site Aggregator

Figure 11.25. Example for adding a SharePoint site using the Site Aggregator

Figure 11.26. Site Aggregator in action

Figure 11.27. Site Actions reporting options

Figure 11.28. Site Web Analytics Reports

Figure 11.29. Site Collection Web Analytics Reports

Figure 11.30. Configuring access requests

Figure 11.31. Linking access requests to an email address

Figure 11.32. Default SharePoint groups and their permission levels

Figure 11.33. Default SharePoint permission levels

Figure 11.34. Permissions that can be used for the permission levels

Figure 11.35. User profile and My Site options

Figure 11.36. Homepage of a My Site when first created

Figure 11.37. Adding a colleague

Figure 11.38. Setting your interests

Figure 11.39. Configuring the activities you follow

Figure 11.40. My Content area of a My Site

Figure 11.41. Public profile page

Appendix A. Setting up a test environment

Figure A.1. You can see the system details when you check your computer properties. You can check if you have a 64-bit operating system and also see your current RAM.

Figure A.2. Once you’ve run through the SharePoint Products Configuration Wizard, you’ll need to run though some steps to set up your site. The step shown here is for selecting a template.

Figure A.3. Step to set up the site permissions. At this point, leave them at the defaults and click OK.

Figure A.4. Publishing site after creation. Good job! You now have an environment to use while you learn SharePoint.

Figure A.5. How to reconfigure your web application to an alternate port

Figure A.6. Sign Up page for Office 365

Figure A.7. Admin page for your Office 365 account

Figure A.8. Site collections created for your Office 365 account

Appendix B. Creating your first site

Figure B.1. If you choose to use unique permissions when creating a site, you’ll need to create the visitors, members, and owners groups.

Figure B.2. Navigation options for the top link bar and Quick Launch bar are displayed on all sites by default.

Figure B.3. SharePoint Server site creation options that you might have

Figure B.4. Publishing site with page editing toolbar displayed. This enables administrators to modify the site without impacting the end users.