List of Tables – Construction Project Management: Theory and Practice

List of Tables

Table 2.1 Glossary of project coordinator’s traits (Katz 1974, Pettersen 1991, Goodwin 1993, Kerzner 2002, El-Sabaa 2001)

Table 2.2 Success variables for construction organization

Table 3.1 Details of transactions carried out by m/s Alpha Industries for April to June

Table 3.2 Summary of transactions for April to June

Table 3.3 Monthly invoice for the example problem

Table 3.4 Computation of cash inflow and cash outflow for the example problem

Table 3.5 Cumulative cash-flow with and without mobilization advance

Table 3.6 Cash-flow computations for the fictitious example

Table 3.7 Summary of net cash-flow for different margins

Table 3.8 Summary of net cash-flow for different margins for different retention conditions

Table 3.9 Computation of month-wise cash requirement for the project

Table 3.10 Summary sheet of interest formulae

Table 3.11 Illustration for Irr

Table 3.12 Illustration of effect of taxation on comparison of alternatives

Table 3.13 Data for B/C ratio computation

Table 3.14 Solution for B/C ratio problem

Table 3.15 Computation for incremental analysis

Table 4.1 Estimation of preliminary costs of different civil engineering jobs

Table 4.2 Types of estimates used in the construction industry

Table 4.3 Details of measurement form

Table 4.4 Abstract of estimated cost or bill of quantity

Table 4.5 The prevalent structured approach

Table 4.6 Plinth area calculation

Table 4.7 Preparation of estimate for schedule items based on C.P.W.D. PAR—2007

Table 4.8 Preparation of estimate for non-scheduled items

Table 4.9 Abstract of cost estimate for Multi Level Car Parking Facility Project

Table 4.10 Summary of civil works

Table 4.11 Abstract of cost estimate for civil works for a sewage treatment plant

Table 5.1 Sample illustrative extract from a Boq

Table 5.2 Sample illustrative example of a percentage rate contract

Table 5.3 Tax and deductions

Table 6.1 Expected duration, standard deviations and variances for activities

Table 6.2 Computation of early occurrence and late occurrence times for the example problem

Table 6.3 Example problem for cpm illustration

Table 6.4 Computations for the CPM example problem

Table 6.5 Explanation of determination of early start and early finish activity times

Table 6.6 Explanation of determination of late finish and late start activity times

Table 6.7 Explanation of determination of early start and early finish activity times

Table 6.8 Explanation of determination of late finish and late start activity times

Table 6.9 Different types of critical activity

Table 6.10 The calculation of duration of activities for retaining wall construction

Table 6.11 Computations of line-of-balance schedule for the construction of retaining wall

Table 6.12 Revised computations of line-of-balance schedule for the construction of retaining wall

Table 7.1 Resource-loading table showing daily requirements of workers based on early-start order

Table 7.2 Resource-loading table showing daily requirements of workers based on late-start order

Table 7.3 Resource-loading table showing daily requirement of workers after levelling

Table 7.4 Project schedule preparation steps in general

Table 7.5 Bill of quantity for the expansion of automobile factory

Table 7.6 Distribution of quantity planned to be executed activity-wise on a monthly basis

Table 7.7 Estimated bill value or invoice value on weekly basis for the case project

Table 7.8 Schedule of plant and equipment for the case project

Table 7.9 Schedule of project staff

Table 7.10 Schedule of materials requirement for the case project

Table 7.11 Schedule of specialized agencies

Table 7.12 Details of activity cost and duration

Table 7.13 Options available for further crashing

Table 8.1 Extract of bill item from bill of quantity

Table 8.2 Estimation of resources for earthwork operation

Table 8.3 Illustration of equipment-owning cost

Table 8.4 Illustration of operating fuel and power cost for the required resources

Table 8.5 Illustration for operating labour for the required resources

Table 8.6 Summary of owning cost, fuel/power cost and operational labour cost for the required resources

Table 8.7 Unit rate estimating method for derivation of material rates for 1 m3 of cement concrete

Table 8.8 Unit rate estimating method for labour for producing and placing of 1 m3 of cement concrete

Table 8.9 Illustration of uniform, front and back loading of mark-up

Table 8.10 Details of bids involving C and X

Table 8.11 Details of bids involving C

Table 8.12 Details of mark-up percentage

Table 8.13 Statistics of responses to mark-up percentage in different business sectors

Table 8.14 Percentage of projects with a given mark-up range in different types of projects

Table 9.1 Earthwork equipments

Table 9.2 Concreting equipments

Table 9.3 Illustrative example showing the effect of depreciation expenses on tax liability

Table 9.4 Illustrative example showing effect of depreciation pattern on tax liability

Table 9.5 Calculation of depreciation using straight-line method

Table 9.6 Calculation of depreciation using sum of years digit method

Table 9.7 Calculation of depreciation using double declining balance method

Table 9.8 Calculating depreciation using double declining balance method and switch-point location

Table 9.9 Using the sinking factor method to monitor changes in the book value of assets

Table 9.10 Asset category and the applicable rates of depreciation

Table 9.11 Calculation of depreciation using macrs method for 5-year class asset

Table 9.12 Calculation of depreciation for equipment at a site

Table 9.13 Problem statement

Table 9.14 Computations for post-tax cash-flow for equipment A

Table 9.15 Computations for post-tax cash-flow for equipment B

Table 9.16 Case 1: Income alone is given

Table 9.17 Case 2: Operating expense alone is given

Table 9.18 Case 3: Income and expense both are given

Table 9.19 Problem data for illustrating sensitivity analysis

Table 9.20 Data for illustrating scenario analysis

Table 9.21 Data for illustrating sensitivity analysis for a ‘more than one alternative’ situation

Table 10.1 A typical journal

Table 10.2a Conventions used for recording debit transactions335

Table 10.2b Conventions used for recording credit transactions

Table 10.3 A typical T-account

Table 10.4 Data for illustrating contract revenue

Table 10.5 Data needed for preparing contract status report

Table 10.6 Data needed for preparing contract status report

Table 10.7 Transaction details for example problem

Table 10.8 Balance sheet as on 31 March 2004

Table 10.9 Data to illustrate different approaches in managing working capital

Table 10.10 Different approaches in financing working capital

Table 10.11 Data for sales and profit for organizations A and B

Table 10.12 Sources and applications of funds statement

Table 11.1 Advantages of centralized and local purchasing (George Stukhart 1995)

Table 11.2 Advantages and disadvantages of early procurement

Table 11.3 Advantages and disadvantages of late procurement

Table 11.4 Some commonly adopted inventory-control policies

Table 11.5 Values of Z for different service levels

Table 12.1 Comparison of qualitative features of various alternatives

Table 12.2 Evaluation of criteria governing foundation selection

Table 12.3 Evaluation criteria and their relative weights

Table 12.4 Pair-wise comparison matrix for performance criteria evaluation

Table 12.5 Analysis matrix

Table 12.6 Comparison of qualitative features of various alternatives for sub-base

Table 12.7 Pair-wise comparison of performance evaluation criteria

Table 12.8 Evaluation criteria and their relative weights

Table 12.9 Analysis matrix for material selection

Table 13.1 Sections and subsections—Iso 9001–2000

Table 14.1 Fundamental features of the principles of insurance

Table 14.2 Insurance policies commonly taken by a typical construction organization

Table 14.3 Summary of risk factors

Table 15.1 Statistics of man-hours worked and frequency rate of accidents over the years for a large Indian construction company

Table 15.2 Cost associated with an injury

Table 15.3 Causes of fatalities (based on about 500 accidents in a large construction company)

Table 15.4 Distribution of construction accidents (usa—1985–89)

Table 15.5 Distribution of construction accidents (Uk—1998–99)

Table 16.1 Cost details of example project

Table 16.2 Extract from bill of quantity for the boundary wall construction project

Table 16.3 Cost-code details for the example project

Table 16.4 Budgeted expenditure

Table 16.5 Expressions for computing eac

Table 16.6 Bcws, Bcwp and Acwp values (Rs 000) for house construction example

Table 16.7 Information related to each work package (BCWS, BCWP and ACWP)

Table 16.8 Cost code details

Table 16.9 Budgetary cost estimate for all the activities of the example project

Table 16.10 Details of cost data at the time of monitoring

Table 16.11 Details of actual costs incurred

Table 16.12 Actual costs incurred cost code-wise

Table 16.13 Cost code-wise variance details

Table 18.1 Some typical tabular and graphical reports generated by P3

Table 19.1 Rank of success attributes (μ ≥ 4.5) based on performance criteria

Table 19.2 Rank of failure attributes (μ ≤ 3.5) based on performance criteria

Table 19.3 Pooled list of factors identified under various performance evaluation parameters