Lucinda Newton-Dunn space-to-think Los Angeles USA – I Used to Be a Design Student

LOS ANGELES, USA

Lucinda Newton-Dunn (space-to-think)

PROFESSIONAL YEARS

12

A VALUABLE QUALITY FOR A DESIGN STUDENT + A DESIGN PROFESSIONAL

To be self-motivated, passionate and proactive + To be passionate, believe in your approach but remain open to changes – communicate clearly

FAVOURITE FOOD NOW

Japanese food of various kinds

YOUR MOST VALUED POSSESSION NOW

Same as then

YEAR OF PROJECT

2010/11

PROFESSIONAL PROJECT BRIEF

Design a print for a furoshiki (Japanese wrapping cloth) 90×90cm based on the concept of folding and wrapping. This project also involved developing the identity of the brand and marketing it.

CLIENT

Link, Tokyo

COLLABORATOR(S)

Kyoko Bowskill, Hennie Haworth

TECHNOLOGY

Artwork produced from a process involving photography, drawing by hand, and finally output in Illustrator on the Mac. Printed on 100% cotton by a traditional Japanese furoshiki printer in Tokyo – a type of screenprinting process.

TIME SPENT

A year (from conceptualizing to production and sales, etc.)

TYPEFACE

Handwritten

WHY DO YOU LIKE THIS PROJECT?

It is something tangible, useful, beautiful and sustainable.

WHAT DO YOU DISLIKE ABOUT IT?

I would have produced it at less expense and got someone else to do the marketing!

OUTCOMES

I learned a lot about working long-distance and about many aspects of business in the product world.

FEEDBACK

There has been some bewilderment over what this product is! People are amazingly intimidated by the introduction of a very simple but ‘new’ concept into the Western market. However, we are discovering ways to make it more accessible and there have been many great reviews on the blogosphere and in particular, compliments on the quality of the product (high Japanese production quality).

DO YOU TEACH?

No.

IS IT POSSIBLE TO TEACH DESIGN?

I think you can certainly teach aspects of design. I wish I had been taught more of the fundamentals in terms of layout, colour theory, typo graphy, business, etc. In the British design education system (at least whereI studied) it seems that most focus is put on concept develop ment. At the time I was happy developing the conceptual side of things but being young and inexperienced (I came straight through the school and college system), I didn’t have the foresight personally to pursue an adequate amount of research in the more technical and business-orientated side of design. Tutors didn’t really push that either. So I came away from college conceptually strong, but lacking the more structural, workmanship skills of design. It’s quite hard as a student to know what to focus on during your time at college and guidance can be quite vague. Time is limited and it is the opportune moment to experiment with ideas and media, but it is also a great time to learn some of the nittygritty. More design theory should be encouraged and internships should be made a compulsory part of a design course.