Richard Walker KK Outlet/Kesselskramer London United Kingdom – I Used to Be a Design Student

LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

Richard Walker (KK Outlet/KesselsKramer)

PROFESSIONAL YEARS

15

A VALUABLE QUALITY FOR A DESIGN STUDENT + A DESIGN PROFESSIONAL

Develop a thick skin + Be punctual and polite

FAVOURITE FOOD NOW

Cheese

YOUR MOST VALUED POSSESSION NOW

I have an original May ’68 poster. It’s the one with the riot policeman holding a baton. I love it, but it has a big SS symbol on the shield. My wife won’t have it in the house. I’ve tried explaining that it’s actually very anti-fascist, but I see her point

YEAR OF PROJECT

2010

PROFESSIONAL PROJECT BRIEF

Poster for an exhibition at KK Outlet. The exhibition was called We’re All Art Directors. Erik Kessels asked all the art directors from KesselsKramer to show their personal work. I was just asked to make something to go on a sandwich board outside the gallery.

CLIENT

KK Outlet/KesselsKramer,

London (United Kingdom)

COLLABORATOR(S)

The letterpress technician at Camberwell College of Arts

TECHNOLOGY

Letterpress

TIME SPENT

1 day

TYPEFACE

Grot something or other (it was the biggest font they had)

WHY DO YOU LIKE THIS PROJECT?

I’ve always liked the finger-pointing icon; I think it’s quite rude.

WHAT DO YOU DISLIKE ABOUT IT?

I like it as it is.

OUTCOMES

A sense of completion. Jobs tend to drag on in advertising. I’ve worked on campaigns that have literally taken two years to make four posters.

FEEDBACK

The finger-pointing poster is the biggest-selling poster in our shop at KK Outlet.

ANYTHING ELSE

I think I prefer the finger-pointing poster in relation to the work then.

DO YOU TEACH?

No.

IS IT POSSIBLE TO TEACH DESIGN?

My tutor used to point me in the direction of what books to have a look at, what exhibitions to go and see and let me get on with it and then hassle me to finish what I’d started. There is an art to being a teacher; just because you work as a designer does not mean you have the ability to teach, and vice versa – I’m not going to pretend I have the ability to teach a class of 30 art students.